Access to State Bar of Texas CLE Materials

The State Bar of Texas provides electronic access to their digital collection of CLE materials at no charge to the faculty, staff, and students of Texas ABA accredited law schools.

CLE1

  1. To access these materials, go to http://www.texasbarcle.com.
  2. Click “Online Library” (on left menu).
    1. Click Subscribe Now! (on upper right).  OR –
  3. Click on “Subscribe to the Library” (in the center).
  4. On the Login/Registration screen, look under the blue LOG IN button. Click on the blue Click here link next to New User?                                                                                                          CLE2
  5. You’re now on the Web Site Registration screen.
  6. If you’re a member of the Texas Bar, fill in your name and bar card number, click GO (and you should be able to skip the rest of these instructions).
  7. If you’re not a member of the Texas Bar, look under the blue Go button and click on the blue click here (If you have a pop up blocker, turn it off.)                                                      CLE3
  8. Fill out the CLE Profile form and click on Save
  9. You will be back at the Login screen. Type in your Email address and the password you set up in step 6.
  10. You need to accept the Online Library Agreement and you have to affirm that you are a full-time faculty member/student affiliated with a Texas ABA-accredited law school.                                                                                                                                                         CLE4
  11.  You will automatically get a pop up window that asks you to Affirm that you Qualify as a current faculty. Click on I Affirm I Qualify.                                                                                CLE5
  12. You’ll see the message that your subscription has been activated. Click the gray link for Search the Library.                                                                                                         CLE6
  13. If you aren’t sure what you are looking for you can click the “View listing of courses for selected years” instead of trying to use the Search function. You will be able to browse the CLE courses for the one you want.                                                                    CLE7
  14. After selecting the CLE course you are interested, click the name of the course (i.e. Immigration Law 101). You will be taken to a listing of the contents included for that course, where you can pick and choose which chapters/articles you wish to read.          CLE8

If you have any questions or need assistance with anything, please contact one of the Law Librarians.  We would be happy to help you.

Peanut Butter and Jelly…and a Demo program is back!

pbandj

Starting Wednesday, January 27th from 11a.m.-1:15p.m., you can come by the Creative Commons (1st floor west side Law Library) and make your own FREE peanut butter and jelly sandwich and see a quick demo!

This week we will help you find out how to contact a Reference Librarian when you have questions! Alyson Drake, our new Student Services Librarian will be there as well.

We will have this program every other Wednesday during the spring semester!

Choosing a Writing Reference Guide

Whether you’re a master wordsmith with a hundred publications or a struggling student who has trouble keeping the active and passive voices straight, you will at some point find yourself either struggling with how to properly structure a sentence, use a word, or drop in punctuation. For those times, it’s a good idea to have a reference guide of some sort. With the new semester starting, students will soon be writing memos, briefs, and seminar papers, and faculty will be diving into the spring submission season, so getting a good reference guide is fairly timely.

First off, getting a copy of The Elements of Style by William Strunk, Jr. is not a bad place to start, though it’s not a cure-all. The original text, published in 1918, is considered the authoritative statement on English usage, even if there has been resistance to it in recent years. There have also been updates to it over the last century. The most well-known version is the “Updated and Expanded” edition written by E.B. White, the author of Charlotte’s Web and other stories, which is commercially available through a number of sources (and in its 5th edition). However, the original Strunk text is public domain and available freely on the web in a number of locations. John W. Cowan, a computer programmer who codifies the syntax of programming languages, maintains an updated version of Strunk’s text on his website.

Moving on from The Elements of Style, there are hundreds of guides, publications, tip sheets, and so on with writing, grammar, punctuation, and style advice. I can’t possibly review all of them here, as each writer has their own needs. Instead, let’s assess your needs with the following questions:

  1. What is your general proficiency level? If you are a highly proficient writer, you’re probably good just picking up a fairly mechanical reference book (for academic writers, your fields’ publication manual may be sufficient). If you’re moderately proficient, you’ll want something that’s thorough, but written for more advanced writers. If you struggle at the basic level, consider some of the books written by the test prep companies, as they have exercises and tips targeted towards struggling writers.
  2. What do you struggle with? If you’re struggling at the sentence level (grammar, punctuation), then you’ll want to focus on guides on proper usage. Punctuation and grammar handbooks abound, so you shouldn’t have too much trouble. If you struggle with putting sentences together into paragraphs or sets of paragraphs, you’ll want to find a guide that helps with broader organization and composition. If you write technically sound compositions that fail to be persuasive or impactful, then you may want to consider guides on rhetoric.
  3. What are you trying to write? If you’re struggling at the most basic level, then this question should wait until you’re more comfortable with the ins and outs of general composition. For those who are more advanced, however, this can be a big question. The practices for journalism, fiction writing, and legal writing can be quite different, so you may want to consider a style guide appropriate to what you’re trying to write. For legal writing, there are three books you may want to consider:
    • The Redbook, by Bryan A. Garner — This style guide for legal documents contains extensive guides on usage, grammar, punctuation, style, and formatting, and also includes the specifics on a number of document formats. Currently in its 3d Edition, published by West (978-0-314-28901-8)
    • Academic Legal Writing, by Eugene Volokh — This guide is a little more advanced, and is geared towards those writing seminar papers, law review articles, and other works of scholarship. It’s relatively cheap (around $30 on most online retailers), and has advice from the word-level to the rhetorical-level, as well as tips for finding topics and getting on law review. Currently in its 4th Edition, published by Foundation Press (978-1-59941-750-9)
    • Making Your Case, by Bryan A. Garner and Antonin Scalia — This book is about argumentation, and specifically about the forms of argumentation in the process of a legal case. If you’re fine with the general mechanics of writing, but are having difficulty being persuasive, this is probably a good place to start. Published by Thomson West (978-0-314-18471-9)

Have questions? Feel free to contact me or the Office of Academic Success and we’d be happy to help!

 

Scholarly Writing Series Instructions

If your professor requires the Scholarly Writing Series as part of your course, please use the following instructions to successfully complete the series.

1. Login to WestlawNext and click on the link to TWEN:

TWEN

2. Once in TWEN, click Add Course:

Add Course

3. Add Texas Tech University School of Law’s Scholarly Writing Series:

Add SW

4. Once added, go to the course and read the Instructions for Students:

Instructions SW

5. Complete the lectures and quizzes and turn in the information to your professor!

*note if you do not print quiz results and turn them into your professor, your professor will not know that you completed the series.

Welcome Back-Study Aids

Welcome back everyone!  We hope you had a wonderful and relaxing break, but now it’s time to get down to business again!  If you find that you need some extra help in a certain subject, the library has you covered.  With our extensive study aid collection, you’re sure to find something that will fit your learning style.  Some of the study aids are also available online for added convenience! (Check out Sue Kelleher’s post on study aids for additional information.)  Come on by the library and see what we have to offer!

study aid blog

 

Regulatory Insight: What is it?

Regulatory Insight is a companion database to Legislative Insight, providing researchers with a platform to facilitate research into U.S. federal administrative law histories from 1936-2015.

Regulatory Insight

Features include:

  • Access to all notices, proposed rules, and final rules;
  • Results that include all regulatory histories associated with a specific C.F.R. portion or U.S. Code citation; and
  • A compilation of Federal Register “articles” with a direct legal basis in that Public Law.

Access to ProQuest’s Regulatory Insight database is available through the Texas Tech Law Library website under the Electronic Databases tab.