Faces of the Library: Erica Lux-Flores

Erica Staff Spotlight

Erica is one of the most hard working students at Texas Tech Law Library. We are very grateful for her hard work and dedication. Although the library isn’t open right now, you can still find Erica at the online circulation help desk. Please, read her profile and get to know Erica:

What are some of the tasks you do for the TTU Law Library? I work at the circulation desk, and assist students with checking out materials, answering reference questions, and generally being available during my shifts.

 

What is your favorite thing about working at the TTU Law Library? The best part is interacting with students, and making their days just a little bit brighter.

 

What is one thing about the law library that current and prospective students should know? If you lost something, check with us in the Library! We may have it.

 

What is your favorite restaurant in Lubbock? Royal Indian Cuisine and Seoul Korean Restaurant are two of my favorite places!

 

What hobbies or activities do you like to do outside the law library? I love to spend time with my pets, enjoy playing video games, and like to catch up on my favorite shows when things are not too busy at school.

 

Tips for Virtual Group Studying & Instructions for Law Library’s Virtual Study Room Reservations

Tips for Successful Virtual Group Studying: 

  1. Keep the group size small and manageable.
    • 3-5 members is a good size for a virtual study group.
  2. Keep Study Group Goals Realistic.
    • Set a realistic goal for efficient studying time. 2 or 3 hours with breaks will likely be productive, but 5 or 6 hours may be too ambitious.
    • Build in time at the beginning to catch up and chat with your friends.
    • Build in study breaks to refresh and re-group, and to give your eyes a break from looking at a screen.
    • Give yourselves grace. This is a unprecedented time for everyone. If your online study group session does not go as planned or perfectly, that’s okay.
  3. Keep Study Time Focused.
    • Pick a group leader to keep the group on track.
    • Select a quiet space in your home with minimal distractions.
    • Try to start on time and end on time.
  4. Stick to a plan.
    • Discuss with group members how the study group time will be used most effectively, depending on the studying styles of the group members.
    • Try to meet the needs of all group members—this is where it is beneficial to keep the size of the group small.
    • Create a schedule/syllabus of tasks:
      • I.e. Spend an hour on practice questions, 20 min talking out/explaining big concepts, 45 min on a practice essay.
  5. Be prepared.
    • Study ahead of time so group time can be used efficiently.
    • Identify concepts that you struggle with.
    • Make a list of questions to ask group members.
  6. Take Action.
    • If there are areas multiple group members are struggling with, email the professor with questions. Send a single email from one group member and share the response with everyone in the group.
    • Several professors have indicated that they are willing to virtually conference with study groups. If your group has some subject areas that they think would be best explained coming from the professor, set up a virtual conference with a professor.
    • Come to the conference prepared. Have specific questions ready. It may be helpful to assign questions to specific group members so everyone participates, keeping the meeting productive and beneficial for everyone.
  7. Reflect.
    • Be honest with yourselves— how productive was the study group?  Be open to discussing with your group members what did and did not work.
    • Adjust based on your reflections.  This will ensure that the study group is working for everyone.computer-man

How to Reserve Virtual Study Rooms

The Law Library has created ten virtual study rooms where students can meet with their study groups.

Students can register to use one of our online study rooms using our Room Reservation system.

Law Students may reserve two 2-hour blocks per day for a total of 4-hours maximum for study rooms per day.

The same study group should not book the same room for more than 4 hours per day.  Students must reserve the room using the link above BEFORE entering a room.

Study Room Reservation Guidelines:

  • Rooms are only available to Law Students, Law Faculty and Law Staff.
  • Rooms are available for booking 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • Each study room booking defaults to a maximum 2-hour reservation.
  • Law Students may reserve two 2-hour blocks per day for a total of 4-hours maximum for study rooms per day.
  • The 2-hour reservations may be consecutive, or may be split.
  • The same study group should not book the same room for more than 4 hours per day.
  • Study room reservations can be made up to 2 weeks in advance.
  • During Law Library finals hours, study room reservations can be made 2 days in advance.
  • You are expected to use the room while you have it reserved, please do not leave the room empty for an extended period of time.
  • If you are finished with a study room before your reservation has expired, please contact the Circulation Desk at 806-742-3957 or email to circulation.law@ttu.edu.

For more resources on how to cope with the challenges of remote learning, please see the Law Library’s Remote Access to Library Services LibGuide, where you can get more tips on working from home, ideas for how to de-stress, and much more.

Faces of the Library: Ben Laney

Ben Laney Staff Spotlight

Ben Laney is a pretty good guy. We are grateful for his work. He has been a valuable asset as we navigate this stressful time. Read his profile here:

What tasks do you do for the TTU Law Library?

I work the circulation desk. I check in and out books and I help patrons find the material they are looking for.

What is your favorite thing about working at the TTU Law Library?

I love the relaxed nature of my work. It’s low stress, which allows me to study for class and enjoy working the desk.

What is one thing about the law library that current and prospective students should know?

The law library has so much more content than you realize. The library has a ton of resources that are useful for any legal practice, whether it be criminal, water, patents, anything.

What is your favorite place to eat in Lubbock?

Blue sky. #BestBurgerEver.

What hobbies or activities do you like to do outside the law library?

I play a lot of music in my free time. I’ve been playing the guitar and the banjo for over 10 years. It’s hard to feel sad and stressed about law school when you’re plucking a few happy chords.

 

Faces of the Library: Joe Lara

Staff Spotlight CP

Meet Joe Lara. He’s an American soldier that helps keep students safe while they study at night in the library. He loves carne guisada and talking about Texas Tech sports. Read his profile here:

What tasks do you do for the TTU Law Library?

Work circulation desk and evening facility supervisor. Make sure everyone and everything is safe and secure at night. Facilitate events in evenings.

What is your favorite thing about working at the TTU Law Library?

Staff and students. I love talking to students and working with the staff members.

What is one thing about the law library that current and prospective students should know?

I we can’t find something off the top of our heads, we can do some research and help find the answer for you.

What is your favorite place to eat in Lubbock?

That’s a tough one, I like them all. But I like to eat at Montelongo’s, their carne guisada is the best.

What hobbies or activities do you like to do outside the law library?

I like going to the shooting range. I also collect guns and coins.

 

Faces of the Library: Elizabeth Balido

Staff Spotlight Balido

If you’re ever in the library, go to the circulation desk and talk to Elizabeth Balido. She loves talking to new people about BOB and her mock trial teams. Please, read her staff profile here:

What tasks do you do for the TTU Law Library?

Student assistant at the circulation desk.

What is your favorite thing about working at the TTU Law Library?

Getting to meet new people at the circulation desk.

What is one thing about the law library that current and prospective students should know?

The law librarians and staff are really nice and helpful. They want to help you so ask them stuff!

What is your favorite place to eat in Lubbock?

The Garden

What hobbies or activities do you like to do outside the law library?

I am on the Board of Barristers, I compete on Mock Trial National teams, and I am in the Criminal Defense Clinic.

 

Faces of the Library: Prof. Dajiang Nie

Nie

Join us in welcoming Prof. Dajiang Nie to our faculty. We are very glad he is with us. Read his full profile here:

1. What is your hometown?

My home town is Huhhot, Inner Mongolia, China.

2. What is your educational and professional background before coming to TTU Law?

I have an LL.B. from China University of Political Science and Law, an LL.M. from William & Mary Law School, a J.D. from University of Richmond School of Law, and an M.L.I.S. from Syracuse University.

I interned and worked in different law libraries, such as Syracuse University Law Library, UCLA Law Library, USC Law Library, and Cornell Law Library.

 

3. What’s your favorite dish? Is it home cooked or from a particular restaurant?

Beef pot roast. I stole the recipe from my mom.

 

4. What are some scholarly interest you would like to pursue?

I am interested in how to connect law school legal research with legal practice technology.

 

5. What’s your favorite TV show or movie?

The Big Bang Theory.

 

6. Do you have any hobbies? If so, what are they?

I am trying to hit three hours and twenty minutes.

 

7. What is your favorite legal research database?

LexisNexis.

 

8. What is your favorite music?
Slow relaxing music.

 

9. What recommendations do you have for legal researchers that are still learning the ropes?

Practice makes perfect.

Faces of the Library: Prof. Janeen Williams

Prof Williams

Join us in welcoming Prof. Janeen Williams to our faculty. We are very glad she is with us. Read her full profile here:

1. What is your hometown?

I was born in Charlotte, NC, but I grew up in Carrboro. It’s a tiny town beside Chapel Hill.

2. What is your educational and professional background before coming to TTU Law?

I received my Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I worked in Labor and Delivery in Atlanta for a few years. I decided it was not the right fit for me and went to law school at Mercer University. I returned to UNC to obtain my Master’s in Library Science. I began my law library career as a Reference Librarian at North Carolina Central School of Law. More recently, I was employed at the Law Library of Congress as a Senior Legal Reference Librarian.

3. What’s your favorite dish? Is it home cooked or from a particular restaurant?

I have to go with a dessert: crème brulee. I’ve never tried to make it at because I don’t trust myself with a blowtorch.

4. What are some scholarly interest you would like to pursue?

I would like to research team dynamics in libraries and explore how to best form and motivate high performing teams. The publication format for this article would be narrative and would include recommendations for best practices. Team dynamics has been studied in other business and work environments.

5. What’s your favorite TV show or movie?

My favorites change often, but the show I could not stop thinking about after I binged watched it, was Fleabag season 2.

6. Do you have any hobbies? If so, what are they?

I like to read and I’m really into weight lifting.

7. What is your favorite legal research database?

Congress.gov: because it’s free and legislative history is my heart.

8. What is your favorite music?

The 1975. I saw them in concert a few months ago and had the best time.

9. What recommendations do you have for legal researchers that are still learning the ropes?

  • Set aside enough time for research. Although the search boxes look like Google, you will not find a quick answer
  • There is no perfect case. You will never find a case that exactly matches your set of facts. You have to learn to be comfortable with substantially similar and a certain amount of gray.