Blackboard FAQs 2016

Are you planning to use Blackboard this fall? If so, you should ask yourself the following questions:

1. Did I request my live Blackboard course shell for fall 2016? If not, please go here for more information and to request your live shell.

*note if you did not request your live Blackboard shell and you see the course listed under your Blackboard courses, it is likely a development shell. You still need to request a the live shell to populate with your enrolled student

2.  Do I want my students to see my Blackboard course immediately? If yes, please follow these instructions in your live Blackboard course to make your course available immediately:

1. From the Control Panel, click on Customization
2. Click on Properties
3. Set Availability to YES  & Select Dates for Course Duration
4. Click Submit

*note the default for course availability is the first day of classes.

3. Have I been working in a development shell, and do I need to copy content from my development shell to my live shell? Or do I want to copy course content from a previous Blackboard live shell? If yes, please click here and follow the instructions.

For additional help, view TTU’s Blackboard instructor support page.

Blackboard Support

 

Confer With Librarians For Optimal Student Success

The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Vitae blog offered advice to faculty about who they should talk to on campus for optimal student success.

The author notes how graduate students are expected to jump into the classroom autonomously once they are hired as faculty. But this autonomy does not mean that faculty should not confer with other professionals on campus to provide a comprehensive educational experience.

The first set of professional listed are the librarians:

If you haven’t spent a good few hours going over your syllabi with a librarian trained in your subject area, you’re shortchanging your course and your students (and yourself). Librarians keep up with the technology in your field. They know the campus holdings and can order better texts for you if they know what you’re teaching.

Librarians can offer even more help if you give them a heads-up about what your assignments are going to be. They can pull relevant texts from the stacks and hold them on reserve for your course. They can come to your classroom and talk about which sources are available and how to judge their quality. They can suggest assignments and let you know about resources you may not have seen yet. And they can be a great help if you have to miss a class–they can work with your students in the library that day or in your classroom to keep them on track with whatever assignment you’ve given while you’re away at that conference.

Librarians live to help. And they’ll be able to help your class do much better work if you’ve taken the time to share your syllabus, your assignments, and your ideas with them.

The author goes on to list academic advisors, student affairs staff, registrar, financial aid, and veterans’ affairs professionals as others for faculty to confer with. As noted, “get out there and talk to people across your campus, in all kinds of jobs. Who knows? You might make a friend. And you’ll definitely make yourself a more effective faculty member.”

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