GPO Launches GovInfo To Replace FDsys In 2017

According to a recent press release, The U.S. Government Publishing Office (GPO) launched www.govinfo.gov and ushered in a new, dynamic way for the public to discover and access Government information on the three branches of the Federal Government.

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GovInfo is user-friendly and provides a responsive navigation system that is accessible on smartphones, tablets, laptops and personal computers. GPO receives information from Federal agencies and organizations in all three branches of the Government.

There are more than 1.5 million titles available on GovInfo, with more added daily. Collections on GovInfo include:

  • The Congressional Record
  • Federal Register
  • Congressional Calendars, Hearings, Reports
  • Bills
  • The U.S. Code
  • Code of Federal Regulations
  • U.S. Courts Opinions
  • The Federal Budget

Its content feeds The Library of Congress’ www.congress.gov and the Federal Register site. Currently in beta, GovInfo will replace GPO’s Federal Digital System (FDsys) in 2017.

Research Guides from the TTU Law Library

Do you ever find yourself looking for help getting started in legal research? Do you find yourself wanting to know the basics of a common resource? Do you wonder what resources the Law Library has available to you? If you ever finding yourself answering “Yes” to one of these questions, then you may want to consider checking out the Texas Tech Law Library’s Research Guide Series (also called “LibGuides”).

The Law Library’s LibGuides are 60+ Research Guides (and growing!) on a variety of topics. Four guides are “Library Services”, with guides marketed to different patron groups, such as Faculty, Students, Members of the Bar, and Members of the Public. These guides help different patrons find the services available to them.

small_logoThe next group of guides are our Course & Subject guides, under the collective brand “What2Use”. These guides are resources in particular subjects, tied to particular College of Law courses. Each guide is divided into parts containing primary law sources, study materials for students, and materials for practitioners and advanced researchers. Guides are available for all required doctrinal courses, all bar exam electives, and a number of other popular electives. We are expanding this list, as well as continually reviewing and updating the existing guides.

The other major category of the Law Library’s LibGuides is the “How2Use” guide series. The How2Use guides focus on specific resources, such as Dorsaneo’s Texas Litigation Guide, or general guides on using resources, such as our guides on Legal Apps or Terms and Connectors searching. We are also continually expanding this list, as well as updating existing guides: Watch for guides on legal citation and O’Connor’s Online in the coming weeks.

The last few guides don’t fit into particular categories, but include such topics as bar prep materials, online people & property searches, and a guide for Spanish-speaking patrons to help find Spanish-language resources.

So, check out the Law Library’s LibGuides when you need a place to get started. You’re sure to find something helpful.

Have a suggestion for a Law Library Research Guide topic, or a resource to be added to one of our existing LibGuides? Send your suggestions to Joshua Pluta at joshua.pluta@ttu.edu.

Monitoring Social Media & the 2016 Presidental Election

LexisNexis has a new site, U.S. Presidential Campaign Tracker, that allows viewers to monitor how the medial is covering the 2016 Presidential Election.

campaign tracker

This site provides a variety of charts that shows various type of information including; Top Candidates 30-Day Coverage, Political Party Article Sentiment and Twitter feeds.

The Political Party Article Sentiment shows the number of media articles published by political party and then shows the percentage of positive, negative and neutral treatments of the articles.

article sentiment

There is also a list of Twitter feeds from various people concerning the election which is interesting to follow.twitter feeds

This is a really interesting site to check-out if you are interested in the elections!

Umbrellas at the Law Library Circulation Desk

umbrellaIt doesn’t rain in West Texas very often but when it does you might need an umbrella!

Remember, the Circulation desk has a limited number of umbrellas that you can borrow when the rain catches you unaware and unprepared.

All we ask is if you borrow an umbrella, please return it so we can loan it out again!

 

SPARC Addendum To Retain Copyright of Scholarly Work

As you submit articles this spring, keep in mind the language of the journal publication agreements.

Many academic authors inadvertently give away the copyright to their work by signing broad publication agreements that give the journals the copyright.

Generally, most law journals have amended their publication agreements to account for authors retaining copyright, thus retaining the ability to share their work (or use their work) as they see fit.images

But there are likely some journals that are behind in updating their publication agreements. If you want to use or share the work that you created, it is best to make sure that you retain the right to do so.

That’s where the SPARC Author Addendum may be useful. If you find that a publication agreement does not contain language allowing you to retain copyright, you might decide to include this addendum to ensure that you do, in fact, retain copyright.

Additionally, if you are unsure about the rights granted by specific journals, please visit SHERPA/RoMEO for more information about publisher copyright policies.