March Madness (3/5/2018)-Lutie Lytle v. Anita Hill

Let’s start the week with a match-up between two phenomenal women! Lutie Lytle, was the first woman to teach in a chartered law wchool in 1897, and Anita Hill is a law professor and advocate for women and civil rights. Which woman inspires you the most? You can vote by participating in our daily Twitter or Facebook poll, or by casting a vote at the Circulation Desk.  Happy voting!

Lutie Lytle-“[I] became impressed with the knowledge of the fact that my own people especially were the victims of legal ignorance. I resolved to fathom its depths and penetrate its mysteries and intricacies in hopes of being a benefit to my people.”

Lyte
Image via Kansas Historical Society.

Lutie Lytle was one of six children to John Lytle, an active politician in Topeka, Kansas. Lutie was a good student and her father was able to use some of his political power to get his daughter a position as an assistant enrolling-desk clerk for the Kansas legislature when Lutie was only 16. While she performed her duties well as a clerk, she decided to become a lawyer to be able to help the African American people who were often taken advantage of by others with more experience in the legal and business world. After graduating as the valedictorian of her class, Lutie returned to her university to teach law in 1897 and became the first woman in the United States to teach at a chartered law school. Afterwards, she continued to spend her life fighting for the rights of women and people of color through the law and through political activism.

Anita Hill-“My belief is that in the past 16 years we have come closer to making the resolution of these issues an honest search for the truth, which, after all, is at the core of all legal inquiry.”

Hill
Image via Fortune.com

Anita Hill is an American attorney and educator who has inspired women to publicly speak out regarding their experiences with sexual harassment in the workplace. Before her outcry many women had experienced what many would now recognize as sexual harassment, but at the time did not know how to handle it. Anita Hill is a highly sought after lecturer, and travels the work speaking on racial and gender issues in the work place. Anita Hill was a professor in civil rights that the Oral Roberts University School of Law, University of Oklahoma School of Law, University of California at Berkeley, and is currently a professor of social policy law and women’s studies at Brandeis University.

Disclaimer: This is a friendly competition that is meant to increase awareness about some amazing women. The match ups were determined by a random outcome generator, and the winner will be determined based solely on the votes submitted by the participants. We are in no way seeking to pit one woman against each other in any inappropriate way, because each woman is inspiring in her own right.

March Madness (3/4/18)-Sonia Sotomayor v. Belva Ann Lockwood

Today’s match-up is between Belva Ann Lockwood, the first woman to be admitted to practice in front of the U.S. Supreme Court and to run for President of the United States and Sonia Sotomayor, first Latina Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Which woman inspires you the most? You can vote by participating in our daily Twitter or Facebook poll, or by casting a vote at the Circulation Desk.  Happy voting!

Belva Ann Lockwood-“If nations could only depend upon fair and impartial judgments in a world court of law, they would abandon the senseless, savage practice of war.”

Lockwood
Image via Wikipedia.

At 14 years old, Belva was working as a school teacher. After getting married and being widowed in 1853, Belva decided she wanted a higher education to support herself and her daughter. Her decision was not popular, as it was extremely unusual for a widow to seek a higher education in those times. Belva remained determined despite her adversaries and by 1857 graduated from college with honors. She then became headmistress of a prestigious school. During these times, she became interested in the study of law. For the next few years, she would continue her studies while also working and realized that regardless of her position, she was often paid less and respected less than her male peers. Belva became active in women’s rights and opened a co-educational school for both genders. She was rejected from the Colombian Law School on the basis of her gender. Despite admittance to what is now the George Washington University Law School and completion of the coursework, she and other women at the school were denied diplomas. Belva wrote a directly to the current President of the United States asking for justice and within a week received her diploma. However, Belva’s struggles in the legal profession continued due to her remarriage and her gender. She struggled to keep up a practice and be accepted by other professionals. Despite support from some members of the profession, it took two applications before Belva became the first woman to be admitted to practice and argue in front of the United States Supreme Court. She eventually drafted legislation to promote women’s rights as individuals and continued to be active in the women’s rights movement. She ran for President of the United States in 1884 and 1888 for a third party. She eventually became a well-respected writer on the subject of women’s suffrage and property law reform.

 

Sonia Sotomayor-“It is important for all of us to appreciate where we come from and how that history has really shaped us in ways we might not understand.”

Sotomayor
Image via Wikipedia.

Inspired by fictional female detective Nancy Drew but limited by Type One diabetes from young age, Justice Sotomayor decided to go into the legal profession at age 10 after only being fully fluent in English for a single year. After entering Princeton and then Yale on scholarships, she spent the majority of her career, both academically and professionally, fighting for rice, gender and ethnic equality and education. She was an active member of many boards and agencies, allowing Justice Sotomayor to be extremely influential in reforms of all kind. Justice Sotomayor was nominated to the Supreme Court in 2009 and since has become a voice for the rights of defendants and criminal justice reform. She is still serving on the Supreme Court.

Disclaimer: This is a friendly competition that is meant to increase awareness about some amazing women. The match ups were determined by a random outcome generator, and the winner will be determined based solely on the votes submitted by the participants. We are in no way seeking to pit one woman against each other in any inappropriate way, because each woman is inspiring in her own right.

March Madness (3/3/18)-Ruth Bader Ginsburg v. Amy Klobuchar

Today’s head-to-head is between Amy Klobuchar, the first female senator of Minnesota, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the first female Jewish Justice of the Supreme Court. Which woman inspires you the most? You can vote by participating in our daily Twitter or Facebook poll, or by casting a vote at the Circulation Desk.  Happy voting!

Amy Klobuchar-“We’ve got great potential in our country and the only way we’re going to make sure kids are getting the degrees that they need, make sure we’re getting through that red tape, is by working together.”

Klobuchar
Image via Wikipedia.

After graduating valedictorian of her high school, Amy went to college at Yale University. While there, she interned for a senator before turning her time towards her 150 page senior thesis. She graduated magna cum laude before entering the University Of Chicago Law School. Amy worked as a prosecutor and corporate lawyer prior to having her child, when she was forced by the hospital to leave less than 24 hours after giving birth when her daughter could not swallow. She spent time advocating the Minnesota State legislature for a bill that would guarantee new mothers a 48 hour hospital stay at least and eventually this exact bill was made a federal policy. She was the county attorney for Hennepin County for 8 years before running for the United States Senate. After beating her opponents, Amy became the first female senator from Minnesota and continues to sit on the Senate now. She has consistently advocated for healthcare reform and for civil liberties. Additionally, she was one of the biggest voices calling for the investigation of President Trump’s financial and political ties to Russia during and after his election.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg-“Fight for the things that you care about, but do it in a way that will lead others to join you.”

Ginsburg
Image via Oyez.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was the only surviving child of two Jewish immigrants and her mother encouraged Justice Ginsburg’s education from a very young age. After marrying and giving birth to her first child, Justice Ginsburg enrolled at Harvard University, where she was immediately introduced to and discouraged by the male views of her gender in the legal profession. After experiencing many forms of gender discrimination personally, including being told she would be paid less as a law professor because she had a husband with a decent job, Justice Ginsburg became one of the most well-known advocates and legal researchers for women’s rights. She argued several times successfully to the all-male Supreme Court of the United States and her successes as a whole discouraged legislatures from treating women and men differently. After serving as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals, President Clinton appointed Justice Ginsburg as the second female justice on the Supreme Court and the first female Jewish Justice. Justice Ginsburg used her position to continue the fight for women’s rights, upholding the Roe v. Wade decision and criticizing any legislation or cases that limited the ability of women to make their own decisions.

Disclaimer: This is a friendly competition that is meant to increase awareness about some amazing women. The match ups were determined by a random outcome generator, and the winner will be determined based solely on the votes submitted by the participants. We are in no way seeking to pit one woman against each other in any inappropriate way, because each woman is inspiring in her own right.

March Madness (3/2/18)-Sandra Day O’Connor v. Arabella Mansfield

Today’s match-up is between Sandra Day O’Connor, the first woman Supreme Court Justice and Arabella Mansfield,  America’s first female lawyer. This is a match-up of firsts! Which woman inspires you the most? You can vote by participating in our daily Twitter or Facebook poll, or by casting a vote at the Circulation Desk.  Happy voting!

Sandra Day O’Connor-“Despite the encouraging and wonderful gains and the changes for women which have occurred in my lifetime, there is still room to advance and to promote correction of the remaining deficiencies and imbalances.”

O'Connor
Image via Wikipedia.

Born in El Paso, Texas, Justice O’Connor grew up on a ranch in Arizona and attended private school back in El Paso. Justice O’Connor attended Stanford University Law where she served on the Law Review journal there. She chose to travel with her husband when he was drafted in WWII and served as a civilian attorney for the Army’s Quartermaster Corps. After returning to the U.S, she settled in Arizona where she served as Assistant Attorney General. Eventually, she ran for the Arizona State Senate and in 1973 was the first woman to be any state’s Majority leader. She received notification the day before the public announcement that she was going to be nominated by President Reagan to the Supreme Court, though she hadn’t known she was even a finalist for the position at the time. Justice O’Connor eventually became known as a swing vote in many historic cases, including the famous Roe v. Wade, where regardless of her moral opposition to abortion, Justice O’Connor refused to overturn the case that allowed women the right to choose.

Arabella Mansfield-“The theory of this Government from the beginning has been perfect equality to all the people.”

Mansfield
Image via Wikipedia.

Born the second child of a farmer, Arabella was admitted into Iowa Wesleyan University in 1862 and graduated in 1866 as valedictorian. Due to men leaving for the Civil War, Arabella became one of America’s first woman college professors before studying for two years at her brother’s law firm as an apprentice. She took the bar in Iowa and was admitted into the Iowa bar in 1869 despite Iowa’s statutes saying that only white males could be admitted. Soon after, Iowa changed its statutes and was the first state to allow women to practice law.


Disclaimer:
This is a friendly competition that is meant to increase awareness about some amazing women. The match ups were determined by a random outcome generator, and the winner will be determined based solely on the votes submitted by the participants. We are in no way seeking to pit one woman against each other in any inappropriate way, because each woman is inspiring in her own right. 

March Madness (3/1/2018)-Janet Reno vs. Michelle Obama

Our first match-up is between Janet Reno, the first woman to serve as U.S. Attorney General vs. Michelle Obama, first African American First Lady. Both of these women have made great strides in their respective fields. Which woman inspires you the most? You can vote by participating in our daily Twitter or Facebook poll, or by casting a vote at the Circulation Desk.  Happy voting!

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Image via Wikipedia.

Michelle Obama-First African American First Lady of the United States-“One of the lessons that I grew up with was to always stay true to yourself and never let what somebody else says distract you from your goals. And so when I hear about negative and false attacks, I really don’t invest any energy in them, because I know who I am.”

Born in the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, Michelle was determined from a young age to be a good student, as her father had wanted for her. She attended Chicago’s first magnet school, despite the location being three hours one way from her home. Her hard work in school paid off as Michelle graduated salutatorian and went on to follow her older brother to Princeton University. While there, Michelle worked with the Third World center, an academic and cultural group for African American Students, and published a thesis about African American Princeton Graduates. After graduating cum laude, Michelle went on to earn her law degree from Harvard Law. She continued to advocate for minorities, including participating in demonstrations to fight for the hiring of minority professors.  As First Lady, she campaigned for minority rights, women’s rights and became a well-known advocate for education reform, spurring changes in all of those areas.

 

Janet Reno-First Woman to Serve as U.S. Attorney General-“Until the day I die, or until the day I can’t think anymore, I want to be involved in the issues that I care about.”

Reno
Image via National Portrait Gallery website, Smithsonian Institution.

Janet grew up in Miami, Florida, graduating from her high school as valedictorian and debate champion. After college at Cornell University, Janet enrolled in Harvard Law School, one of only 16 women in her class of 500. She worked as the State Attorney for Miami-Dade County for years, consistently being re-voted into office despite her occasional losses in high profile, controversial cases. She was well known for aggressively prosecuting child abuse cases, where she was able to drastically change the way that children were able to give testimony in court to make the children more comfortable and safe. Despite the occasional controversy surrounding her involvement in cases, Janet was confirmed in 1993 as the first Woman Attorney General of the United States. During her tenure, she continued to change polices in favor of witness interviewing, especially those of children.

Disclaimer: This is a friendly competition that is meant to increase awareness about some amazing women. The match ups were determined by a random outcome generator, and the winner will be determined based solely on the votes submitted by the participants. We are in no way seeking to pit one woman against each other in any inappropriate way, because each woman is inspiring in her own right.