Let’s Play Ball (or Frisbee)!

In need of a mental health break?  Maybe it’s time for some fresh air and exercise (at least on those days when Lubbock doesn’t hit triple digits, in which case we recommend checking out some of the games we have in the Collaborative Commons).

sporting equipmentThanks to the Texas Tech Law Student Wellness Committee, the Law Library now has a variety of sports equipment available for check-out to help you de-stress.  Even fifteen minutes of fresh air can help you rejuvenate in between study sessions.

The items in our new sports collection include:

  • Volleyball
  • Football with tee
  • Frisbee
  • Playground ball
  • Nerf football
  • Set of velcro paddles and ball

To borrow any of this equipment, simply stop by the Circulation Desk with your student ID and ask for the item you’d like to borrow. Then, go take advantage of the wonderful green space around the law school and clear your head.

 

Prepping for the Bar? The Library’s Here to Help!

The library is here to help with your bar exam preparation–with both dedicated study spaces and an even more robust collection of bar prep materials than in past years.

This summer, we’ve blocked out Study Rooms BarPrepCollection.jpg5B and 230A for students who are studying for the bar exam, so those rooms are available for any student who wants to be studying for the bar exam in a quiet space. (You can also sign up for any of our other study rooms at any time, for example if you want to do group study).

Our print study materials can be found in the reserves area behind the Circulation Desk. The collection was reorganized earlier this year by part of the bar exam you’re preparing for (MBE, essays, etc.). For help finding materials, please ask for assistance at the Circulation Desk.

In addition to Barbri, Kaplan, and Themis bar prep materials from years past (which you could use if you need more practice questions beyond what your program has), we have many other materials that might be of interest:

ChristopherBook2

 

Struggling with the essay section? We have four copies of Prof. Christopher’s new book, “Tacking the Texas Essays: Efficient Preparation for the Texas Bar Exam.” Prof. Christopher’s book has general information on writing good answers to Texas bar exam essays, tips for how to practice, and then practice questions and tips for specific subjects. It’s a wonderful resources for prepping for essays.

 

 

 
Flashcards.jpg We also have a wonderful collection of flashcards for MBE prep. In addition to the Emanuel’s MBE flashcards, we have the Critical Pass MBE Flashcards for a variety of subjects, such as Civil Procedure and Constitutional Law.

 

 

Bootcamp for the MBE.jpgSteve Emanuel’s Bootcamp for the MBE has volumes for different subjects, including Evidence, Torts, and many more. It also includes a helpful MBE Self-Assessment Test and a Simulated MBE with Questions and Answers.

 

 

In addition to our print collection, our West Academic Study Aids collection includes a few bar prep-related resources.  The Exam Pro Bar Prep Workbook includes tips on both essays and multiple choice questions and gives techniques for problems by different subject areas. Simply create an account and get going.

Women’s History Month, Championship Round — Ruth Bader Ginsburg v. Barbara Jordan (4/2/2018)

The Women’s History Month March Madness contest concludes with our Championship match-up between Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Barbara Jordan! You can vote by participating in our daily Twitter or Facebook poll, or by casting a vote at the Circulation Desk.  Happy voting!

Ginsburg
Image from Oyez.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg-“Fight for the things that you care about, but do it in a way that will lead others to join you.”

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was the only surviving child of two Jewish immigrants and her mother encouraged Justice Ginsburg’s education from a very young age. After marrying and giving birth to her first child, Justice Ginsburg enrolled at Harvard University, where she was immediately introduced to and discouraged by the male views of her gender in the legal profession. After experiencing many forms of gender discrimination personally, including being told she would be paid less as a law professor because she had a husband with a decent job, Justice Ginsburg became one of the most well-known advocates and legal researchers for women’s rights. She argued several times successfully to the all-male Supreme Court of the United States and her successes as a whole discouraged legislatures from treating women and men differently. After serving as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals, President Clinton appointed Justice Ginsburg as the second female justice on the Supreme Court and the first female Jewish Justice. Justice Ginsburg used her position to continue the fight for women’s rights, upholding the Roe v. Wade decision and criticizing any legislation or cases that limited the ability of women to make their own decisions.

Jordan
Image from Wikipedia.

Barbara Jordan-“More is required of public officials than slogans and handshakes and press releases. More is required. We must hold ourselves strictly accountable. We must provide the people with a vision of the future.”

Born into a very religious family, Barbara Jordan was inspired in high school by Edith Sampson to become a lawyer. After attending university and law school, Barbara started practicing in Texas. She spent the majority of her career advocating for civil rights and campaigning to enter one public office or another. Barbara’s third attempt to gain a seat in the Texas Senate was successful and she was the first African-American woman to be elected into that position. She was the president pro tem of the Senate for a period and also served a single day as acting state governor. In 1972, she was elected the first female to be a representative for Texas in the House of Representatives. She remained a well-known member of politics until 1979 (prior to which she was mentioned as being a possible running mate with President Carter) when she retired to become an adjunct professor at UT Austin. Barbara might have been elected to the Supreme Court, if her declining health had not been a factor.

Disclaimer: This is a friendly competition that is meant to increase awareness about some amazing women. The match ups were determined by a random outcome generator, and the winner will be determined based solely on the votes submitted by the participants. We are in no way seeking to pit one woman against each other in any inappropriate way, because each woman is inspiring in her own right.

March Madness, Semifinals (3/30/2018) — Barbara Jordan v. Sarah Weddington

The second Semifinals match-up of our Women’s History Month March Madness contest is between Barbara Jordan and Sarah Weddington. You can vote by participating in our daily Twitter or Facebook poll, or by casting a vote at the Circulation Desk.  Happy voting!

Jordan
Image from Wikipedia.

Barbara Jordan-“More is required of public officials than slogans and handshakes and press releases. More is required. We must hold ourselves strictly accountable. We must provide the people with a vision of the future.”

Born into a very religious family, Barbara Jordan was inspired in high school by Edith Sampson to become a lawyer. After attending university and law school, Barbara started practicing in Texas. She spent the majority of her career advocating for civil rights and campaigning to enter one public office or another. Barbara’s third attempt to gain a seat in the Texas Senate was successful and she was the first African-American woman to be elected into that position. She was the president pro tem of the Senate for a period and also served a single day as acting state governor. In 1972, she was elected the first female to be a representative for Texas in the House of Representatives. She remained a well-known member of politics until 1979 (prior to which she was mentioned as being a possible running mate with President Carter) when she retired to become an adjunct professor at UT Austin. Barbara might have been elected to the Supreme Court, if her declining health had not been a factor.

Weddington
Image from Britannica.

Sarah Weddington-“Everyone wants to know they have made a difference…I know I have. I may be tired, but I am not bored.”

Born in Abilene, Texas, Sarah Weddington was constantly involved in school activities before graduating from high school a full two years early. She entered the University of Texas Law School at only 19 and graduated in the top quarter of her class three years later. Despite being a successful student, Sarah had trouble obtaining a job after graduation. She decided to join a group of law graduates that wanted to challenge anti-abortion statutes. Soon after joining, the group was approached by a woman who’d been prevented from having an abortion and wished to sue the district attorney known for enforcing the statute. Because of her own history, having had an illegal abortion years earlier in Mexico, Sarah started researching the case and soon was deep in the Roe v. Wade In 1971 and 1972, Sarah presented the case in front of the Supreme Court of the United States and argued based on many of the Amendments to the Constitution and on privacy decisions made by the Supreme Court previously. In 1973, the Supreme Court overturned the Texas abortion laws and sided in favor of Sarah’s case, making her the youngest person ever to argue successfully to the Supreme Court at only 27 years old. After the Roe v. Wade decision, Sarah was elected to the Texas House of Representatives and was an adjunct professor at the University of Texas at Austin.

Disclaimer: This is a friendly competition that is meant to increase awareness about some amazing women. The match ups were determined by a random outcome generator, and the winner will be determined based solely on the votes submitted by the participants. We are in no way seeking to pit one woman against each other in any inappropriate way, because each woman is inspiring in her own right.

March Madness, Semifinals (3/29/2018) — Ruth Bader Ginsburg v. Eliza “Lyda” Burton Conley

The Women’s History Month March Madness contest enters the Semifinals this morning, with a match-up between Ruth Bader Ginsburg v. Eliza “Lyda” Burton Conley! You can vote by participating in our daily Twitter or Facebook poll, or by casting a vote at the Circulation Desk.  Happy voting!

Ginsburg
Image via Oyez.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg-“Fight for the things that you care about, but do it in a way that will lead others to join you.”

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was the only surviving child of two Jewish immigrants and her mother encouraged Justice Ginsburg’s education from a very young age. After marrying and giving birth to her first child, Justice Ginsburg enrolled at Harvard University, where she was immediately introduced to and discouraged by the male views of her gender in the legal profession. After experiencing many forms of gender discrimination personally, including being told she would be paid less as a law professor because she had a husband with a decent job, Justice Ginsburg became one of the most well-known advocates and legal researchers for women’s rights. She argued several times successfully to the all-male Supreme Court of the United States and her successes as a whole discouraged legislatures from treating women and men differently. After serving as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals, President Clinton appointed Justice Ginsburg as the second female justice on the Supreme Court and the first female Jewish Justice. Justice Ginsburg used her position to continue the fight for women’s rights, upholding the Roe v. Wade decision and criticizing any legislation or cases that limited the ability of women to make their own decisions.

Lydaconley
Image via Wikipedia.

Eliza “Lyda” Burton-“One hundred thousand dollars would be no inducement whatever in buying my consent to the desecration of the graves of my parents.”

Lyda Conley was the first Native American woman lawyer in the United States when she was admitted to the Missouri State Bar in 1902. She was a member of the Wyandot tribe and best known for her active defense of the Huron Place Cemetery in Kansas City, Kansas. The Cemetery was guaranteed by an 1855 treaty because it was the burial grounds for many Wyandot members but Congress approved the sale and removal of the bodies in the Cemetery for commercial use in 1906. Lyda filed suit to stop the sale and she and her sisters guarded the cemetery with weapons constantly. She took her case to the U.S Supreme Court, and was the first person to argue that the government owed protection to the burial grounds of Native Americans. Although the Court ruled against her, the land was never actually sold as there were no buyers willing to take it due to Lyda’s work to turn the public against the sale. Now the land is an historic landmark and Lyda herself is buried there.

 

Disclaimer: This is a friendly competition that is meant to increase awareness about some amazing women. The match ups were determined by a random outcome generator, and the winner will be determined based solely on the votes submitted by the participants. We are in no way seeking to pit one woman against each other in any inappropriate way, because each woman is inspiring in her own right.