Regulatory Insight Featured Spotlight: LibGuide

This is the first post in a three-part series spotlighting Regulatory Insight database features.

Regulatory Insight provides a user-friendly LibGuide as a valuable starting place for first-time researchers. The LibGuide is accessible off the home page by clicking the question mark icon and selecting LibGuide off the drop down menu located in the top, right-hand corner.

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The LibGuide (pictured below) neatly outlines the purpose of the database, what the regulatory process consists of, how to search for content, and what to expect the documents provided to look like.

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For example, under the “Searching Regulatory Insight” tab, the LibGuide explains the three ways to search for documents in Regulatory Insight: (1) the Basic Search form on the front page, (2) the Advanced Search form, and (3) the Search by Number form. Meanwhile, the “Content Types” tab provides detailed descriptions for the content types listed on the Advanced Search page of Regulatory Insight.

Access to ProQuest’s Regulatory Insight database is available through the Texas Tech Law Library website under the Electronic Databases tab.

The Best Time To Submit Publications This Spring

Contrary to popular belief, according to The Yale Law Journal data, the best time to submit publications in the spring cycle may be late February or even early March.

The Yale Law Journal reviewed its submissions data and found that the Journal’s experience is consistent with anecdotal reports that the spring submissions cycle is increasingly front-loaded, with a growing percentage of pieces submitted in the first half of February. However, this trend has not carried into the fall cycle, where submission ratios have remained relatively consistent across recent volumes.

The prevailing wisdom in the spring cycle appears to be “submit early.” However, from the Journal’s perspective, this approach does not offer any appreciable advantage.

[O]f the dozen or so publication offers that the Journal makes in the spring cycle, historically a majority have been made in March or later.

Also, authors should know about a possible downside to submitting early in the spring cycle: slower review times. The front-loaded cycle places a significant strain on the Articles & Essays Committee, and in most instances it takes several days—perhaps even a week—before an editor first reviews a new submission

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As mentioned over at the PrawfsBlawg when discussing the downside to submitting early, [a] more plausible and interesting possibility [rather than the strain it places] is that early submissions are disadvantaged because novice editors are not only deluged with submissions but relatively risk averse. At the start of the process, editors may be holding out hope for The Perfect Article and feel afraid of recommending acceptance of pieces that their colleagues or academic reviewers will regard as rubbish. By contrast, late-cycle editors know what kind of article they like and have a better sense of what is left in the by-then dwindling pool of submissions. 

Food for thought during the upcoming submission cycle.

Need Help with a Research Assignment? Chat With A Librarian!

Ask a Librarian

Are you having trouble formulating a research strategy? Not sure what resources to use? Wondering what are the reference or circulation desk hours? Cannot find the document needed?

You can get real-time help regardless of location—at home, on campus, at a favorite coffee shop, or in a study room.

To access a chat session: Go to the “Ask a Librarian” on the Library’s website and type in your question in the Chat box. A research librarian will help you.

Chat Hours:

Monday- Thursday, 8:00 am – 6:00 pm

Friday, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

CALI Lessons

During the course of the semester, you may want to take advantage of CALI lessons to help you prepare for exams. CALI (Computer Assisted Legal Instruction)tnt_legalpapers_6_logo includes tutorials that are created by law school faculty for students. There are over 50 web-based lessons covering more than 35 law school subjects. Texas Tech University School of Law is a member of CALI, so the lessons are available to you.

If you haven’t already done so, here’s how you can set up a CALI account:

1. Get the authorization code for Tech Law.

  • You can do this by stopping by the Law Library’s reference & information desk and asking for a CALI card.
  • Or, you can also retrieve it online via the Law Library’s Electronic Resources page, alphabetically listed under CALI.

2. Once you have the code, go to http://www.cali.org and, on the right side of the screen, click the link for “Register.”

3. Complete the registration process, which will require you to create your own username and password, in addition to entering your CALI authorization code.

Once you have registered with CALI, you will have full access to all of their resources. You can search for lessons in a variety of ways, including by topic and by casebook.

Laptops in the Classroom

The most recent in a string of articles discussing the effects of laptops in the classroom was recently published in the Winter 2016 volume of The National Jurist. The study referenced in the article, entitled “The Pen is Mightier Than the Keyboard: Advantages of coffee-apple-iphone-laptopLonghand Over Laptop Note Taking,” compared performance between students taking their notes by hand versus those who typed their notes. The study concluded that, while the efficiency of typing appeals to many students, computers are a detriment to student absorption of information.

According to another study by the University of Louisville Law Review, nearly 90 percent of students using laptops during a class are engaging in online activities unrelated to the class at some point during class—whether it be email, instant messaging, shopping, or checking out their fantasy football league standings. But, even when internet is not an option and they are just using their laptops for note taking purposes, their learning may still be impaired because they are not processing the information. By taking handwritten notes, students are forced to listen carefully and analyze what the most important pieces of information are. This process is called “encoding” and is the key to cementing learning—and it doesn’t happen when students are just transcribing what the professor says.

So should we ban all laptops? Not necessarily. Some classes make use of technology during class and many students get nervous trying to take notes without their computers. However, it might be worth informing students that they may be doing a disservice to themselves by choosing to use their computers in the classroom.

Access to State Bar of Texas CLE Materials

The State Bar of Texas provides electronic access to their digital collection of CLE materials at no charge to the faculty, staff, and students of Texas ABA accredited law schools.

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  1. To access these materials, go to http://www.texasbarcle.com.
  2. Click “Online Library” (on left menu).
    1. Click Subscribe Now! (on upper right).  OR –
  3. Click on “Subscribe to the Library” (in the center).
  4. On the Login/Registration screen, look under the blue LOG IN button. Click on the blue Click here link next to New User?                                                                                                          CLE2
  5. You’re now on the Web Site Registration screen.
  6. If you’re a member of the Texas Bar, fill in your name and bar card number, click GO (and you should be able to skip the rest of these instructions).
  7. If you’re not a member of the Texas Bar, look under the blue Go button and click on the blue click here (If you have a pop up blocker, turn it off.)                                                      CLE3
  8. Fill out the CLE Profile form and click on Save
  9. You will be back at the Login screen. Type in your Email address and the password you set up in step 6.
  10. You need to accept the Online Library Agreement and you have to affirm that you are a full-time faculty member/student affiliated with a Texas ABA-accredited law school.                                                                                                                                                         CLE4
  11.  You will automatically get a pop up window that asks you to Affirm that you Qualify as a current faculty. Click on I Affirm I Qualify.                                                                                CLE5
  12. You’ll see the message that your subscription has been activated. Click the gray link for Search the Library.                                                                                                         CLE6
  13. If you aren’t sure what you are looking for you can click the “View listing of courses for selected years” instead of trying to use the Search function. You will be able to browse the CLE courses for the one you want.                                                                    CLE7
  14. After selecting the CLE course you are interested, click the name of the course (i.e. Immigration Law 101). You will be taken to a listing of the contents included for that course, where you can pick and choose which chapters/articles you wish to read.          CLE8

If you have any questions or need assistance with anything, please contact one of the Law Librarians.  We would be happy to help you.

Peanut Butter and Jelly…and a Demo program is back!

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Starting Wednesday, January 27th from 11a.m.-1:15p.m., you can come by the Creative Commons (1st floor west side Law Library) and make your own FREE peanut butter and jelly sandwich and see a quick demo!

This week we will help you find out how to contact a Reference Librarian when you have questions! Alyson Drake, our new Student Services Librarian will be there as well.

We will have this program every other Wednesday during the spring semester!