Monitoring Social Media & the 2016 Presidental Election

LexisNexis has a new site, U.S. Presidential Campaign Tracker, that allows viewers to monitor how the medial is covering the 2016 Presidential Election.

campaign tracker

This site provides a variety of charts that shows various type of information including; Top Candidates 30-Day Coverage, Political Party Article Sentiment and Twitter feeds.

The Political Party Article Sentiment shows the number of media articles published by political party and then shows the percentage of positive, negative and neutral treatments of the articles.

article sentiment

There is also a list of Twitter feeds from various people concerning the election which is interesting to follow.twitter feeds

This is a really interesting site to check-out if you are interested in the elections!

Make an Appointment with a Law Librarian!

calendarAttention Law Faculty and Law Students. Need help with your legal research or finding an appropriate research topic?  Then make an appointment with a law librarian!  While you are always welcome to stop by the Reference/Circulation Desk during regular Help Desk hours, the law librarians also encourage you to schedule an individual appointment that best accommodates your schedule to provide personalized assistance.

Faculty and law students can request an appointment with a law librarian by e-mailing reference.law@ttu.edu or calling tel:1-806-742-7155. Please be sure to include information on your topic or assignment so we can prepare before we meet. A law librarian will contact you to confirm your appointment.

Legal Essay Contest Catalog

Do you love to research and write?  Did you know you can get paid for it if you have the winning submission to one of the many legal essay competitions that happen each year?  Some contests provide a specific topic or hypothetical for students to respond to, while others simply want an essay on a general field of law, leaving the specifics up to the prospective authors.  There are monetary prizes and the winners often also get the opportunity to attend a conference or be published in the hosting organization’s publication.

Our friends at Richmond Law keep the Legal Essay Contest Catalog, a comprehensive list of all the essay competitions out there targeted at law students.  You can filter your search by topic and contest deadline.  There are lots of contests open this spring and summer–on topics from maritime law to constitutional law to labor & employment law, so get researching and writing!  Don’t forget to come see a librarian if you need help coming up with a topic–we can get you started on the right path!

Choosing a Writing Reference Guide

Whether you’re a master wordsmith with a hundred publications or a struggling student who has trouble keeping the active and passive voices straight, you will at some point find yourself either struggling with how to properly structure a sentence, use a word, or drop in punctuation. For those times, it’s a good idea to have a reference guide of some sort. With the new semester starting, students will soon be writing memos, briefs, and seminar papers, and faculty will be diving into the spring submission season, so getting a good reference guide is fairly timely.

First off, getting a copy of The Elements of Style by William Strunk, Jr. is not a bad place to start, though it’s not a cure-all. The original text, published in 1918, is considered the authoritative statement on English usage, even if there has been resistance to it in recent years. There have also been updates to it over the last century. The most well-known version is the “Updated and Expanded” edition written by E.B. White, the author of Charlotte’s Web and other stories, which is commercially available through a number of sources (and in its 5th edition). However, the original Strunk text is public domain and available freely on the web in a number of locations. John W. Cowan, a computer programmer who codifies the syntax of programming languages, maintains an updated version of Strunk’s text on his website.

Moving on from The Elements of Style, there are hundreds of guides, publications, tip sheets, and so on with writing, grammar, punctuation, and style advice. I can’t possibly review all of them here, as each writer has their own needs. Instead, let’s assess your needs with the following questions:

  1. What is your general proficiency level? If you are a highly proficient writer, you’re probably good just picking up a fairly mechanical reference book (for academic writers, your fields’ publication manual may be sufficient). If you’re moderately proficient, you’ll want something that’s thorough, but written for more advanced writers. If you struggle at the basic level, consider some of the books written by the test prep companies, as they have exercises and tips targeted towards struggling writers.
  2. What do you struggle with? If you’re struggling at the sentence level (grammar, punctuation), then you’ll want to focus on guides on proper usage. Punctuation and grammar handbooks abound, so you shouldn’t have too much trouble. If you struggle with putting sentences together into paragraphs or sets of paragraphs, you’ll want to find a guide that helps with broader organization and composition. If you write technically sound compositions that fail to be persuasive or impactful, then you may want to consider guides on rhetoric.
  3. What are you trying to write? If you’re struggling at the most basic level, then this question should wait until you’re more comfortable with the ins and outs of general composition. For those who are more advanced, however, this can be a big question. The practices for journalism, fiction writing, and legal writing can be quite different, so you may want to consider a style guide appropriate to what you’re trying to write. For legal writing, there are three books you may want to consider:
    • The Redbook, by Bryan A. Garner — This style guide for legal documents contains extensive guides on usage, grammar, punctuation, style, and formatting, and also includes the specifics on a number of document formats. Currently in its 3d Edition, published by West (978-0-314-28901-8)
    • Academic Legal Writing, by Eugene Volokh — This guide is a little more advanced, and is geared towards those writing seminar papers, law review articles, and other works of scholarship. It’s relatively cheap (around $30 on most online retailers), and has advice from the word-level to the rhetorical-level, as well as tips for finding topics and getting on law review. Currently in its 4th Edition, published by Foundation Press (978-1-59941-750-9)
    • Making Your Case, by Bryan A. Garner and Antonin Scalia — This book is about argumentation, and specifically about the forms of argumentation in the process of a legal case. If you’re fine with the general mechanics of writing, but are having difficulty being persuasive, this is probably a good place to start. Published by Thomson West (978-0-314-18471-9)

Have questions? Feel free to contact me or the Office of Academic Success and we’d be happy to help!

 

Welcome Back-Study Aids

Welcome back everyone!  We hope you had a wonderful and relaxing break, but now it’s time to get down to business again!  If you find that you need some extra help in a certain subject, the library has you covered.  With our extensive study aid collection, you’re sure to find something that will fit your learning style.  Some of the study aids are also available online for added convenience! (Check out Sue Kelleher’s post on study aids for additional information.)  Come on by the library and see what we have to offer!

study aid blog

 

Regulatory Insight: What is it?

Regulatory Insight is a companion database to Legislative Insight, providing researchers with a platform to facilitate research into U.S. federal administrative law histories from 1936-2015.

Regulatory Insight

Features include:

  • Access to all notices, proposed rules, and final rules;
  • Results that include all regulatory histories associated with a specific C.F.R. portion or U.S. Code citation; and
  • A compilation of Federal Register “articles” with a direct legal basis in that Public Law.

Access to ProQuest’s Regulatory Insight database is available through the Texas Tech Law Library website under the Electronic Databases tab.

The Law Library Adds Two New Electronic Databases

The Law Library maintains a number of subscriptions to legal and non-legal electronic databases. Last week, the Law Library added two new databases: Fulltext Sources Online and Mobile Apps for Law.

Fulltext Sources OnlineFTO_Reporter 

Fulltext Sources Online (FSO) is a directory of aggregated publications that are accessible online in full text. FSO is updated weekly and includes over 56,000 periodicals, newspapers, newsletters, newswires, and TV or radio transcripts. FSO contains topics ranging from science to finance.

As the name entails, along with the providing the full text of sources, FSO also lists the URLs of publications with Internet archives, noting whether access to them is free or not.

Mobile Apps for Law

Media Apps_ReporterThe Mobile Apps for Law database contains a comprehensive directory of mobile applications for law students and lawyers alike, including both legal research and utility apps for all mobile devices. Apps are searchable by area of law/subject, state, or operating platform. Although iPhone and iPad apps have a more predominant presence on Mobile Apps for Law, the database contains a substantial number of recommended apps for Android users.

To find these electronic databases, visit the Law Library website. On the front page, under Research and Reference, click on “Electronic Databases.” Sort the listings alphabetically to find FSO or Mobile Apps for Law. Listings can also be searched by subject area or provider.