CCH Secured Transactions Guide Featured Spotlight: Annotated Explanations

This is the third post in a four-part series spotlighting CCH Secured Transactions Guide.

CCH Secured Transactions Guide provides annotated explanations of state’s variations of the rules governing secured transactions. These explanations are available through the “Charts, explanations, UCC provisions, state and federal laws and regulation, & other material, organized by topic” link on the main Secured Transactions page. 

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For example, if you wanted to find Texas variations on the UCC regarding secured transactions involving crops you can select “Texas” from the list of states.

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After selecting “Explanations Annotated,” the database provides you with a topically organized list of Texas-specific secured transactions rules. Next, select “Agricultural Transactions” to see rules concerning agriculture.

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Select “Crops” and the database will display annotated provisions that deal with crops on the right-hand side of the screen.

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Access to CCH Secured Transactions Guide database is available through the Texas Tech Law Library website under the Electronic Databases tab. You must register and create an individual user ID using a TTU email address as your user ID. You choose your own password. Please contact a Law Librarian if you have any questions.

 

Gaming the Article Title

Article titles are important because researchers often use keyword searching in the title field to find articles that are highly relevant to their research.

421975855_1280x720Not only is a title important for discoverability, it’s also important to catch the attention of a potential reader and up article views and downloads for impact purposes.

Brian Leiter over at the Law Professor Blogs Network recently highlighted a story illustrating how to game the article title to increase downloads.

I have an article with the (admittedly extremely boring) title “Rethinking Assignor Estoppel” coming out in the Houston Law Review. It has been on SSRN for nine months. I have posted about it twice on Facebook and Twitter, and it has shown up in all the SSRN journals. In that nine months it has garnered 982 views and 172 SSRN downloads.

Late Friday afternoon, prompted by some friends teasing me for the boring headline, I posted the exact same article, with the exact same abstract, but with a new, click-baity title: “Inventor Sued for Infringing His Own Patent. You Won’t Believe What Happened Next.” I did this in part as a joke, and in part as an unscientific test to see how susceptible law professors were to clickbait.

The answer is, quite susceptible indeed. In less than two hours on a Friday night the number of views for this “new” article surpassed the old one. In 26 hours, by late Saturday, more people had downloaded the new article than the old one, even though before downloading you are exposed to the same old boring abstract. And by the end of the weekend, the article had been viewed nearly six times as often as the original and downloaded three times as often as the original.

The article will soon appear in the Houston Law Review under its old, boring title. But it sure looks like titles matter.

Authors would do well to keep this in mind when naming an article. This, coupled with a long, jargon-filled abstract, may just be the key to article impact success.

CCH Secured Transactions Guide Featured Spotlight: Report Summary

This is the second post in a four-part series spotlighting CCH Secured Transactions Guide.

CCH Secured Transactions Guide’s Report Summary is the current awareness component of the resource. Report summaries are issued biweekly, and provide “highlights of legislative, regulatory, judicial, and industry developments affecting the law of secured transactions.” They can be access through the main Secured Transactions page.

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The guides are organized by issue date. If we click the issue No. 1233, we are taken to the most recent issue and the stories included are displayed on the right-hand side of the screen.

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Access to CCH Secured Transactions Guide database is available through the Texas Tech Law Library website under the Electronic Databases tab. You must register and create an individual user ID using a TTU email address as your user ID. You choose your own password. Please contact a Law Librarian if you have any questions.

 

Improved West Academic Study Aids

Some of you are already familiar with the electronic resource for accessing West Academic Study Aids.  This resource allows you to access as many different series and/or subjects as you need without any restrictions.  This, along with other study aid resources were discussed in a previous blog post.

As a reminder, you can access this resource while on the Law School network at https://subscription.westacademic.com/, using a guest account.  You are also able to create a personal login using your Texas Tech email that will allow you to personalize your experience as well as access the resource when not on the University network.  You are able to make notes, keep track of often used titles, etc.

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The newest exciting feature that has just been introduced is the addition of two audio series: the Law School Legends and the Sum and Substance Audio Series.

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A couple of other handy features of the website is the Most Popular At Your School and the Authored By Faculty At Your School sections.

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If you need assistance or have questions about using this electronic resource, please stop by the Law Library or contact one of the Law Librarians.  We would be happy to assist you!

 

December 2016 Law Faculty Publications & News

Throughout December 2016, the Law Library’s Faculty Services & Scholarly Communications Department received alerts for full-time TTU Law Faculty publications and news. Below is the compilation of daily alerts for December 1, 2016 to December 31, 2016.

Published:

  1. Gerry W. Beyer, Wills & Trusts, 2 SMU Ann. Tex. Sur. 517 (2016).
  2. Alyson M. Drake, The Need for Experiential Legal Research Education, 108 Law Libr. J. 511 (2016).
  3. Richard W. Murphy & Sidney A. Shapiro, Arbitrariness Review Made Reasonable: Structural and Conceptual Reform of the “Hard Look,” 92 Notre Dame L. Rev. 331 (2016).
  4. Kyle C. Velte, All Fall Down: A Comprehensive Approach to Defeating the Religious Right’s Challenges to Antidiscrimination Statutes, 49 Conn. L. Rev. 1 (2016).
  5. Robert A. Weninger, The VW Diesel Emissions Scandal and the Spanish Class Action, 23 J. Eur. L. 91 (2016).

Cited:

  1. Professor Spain’s Collaborative Law: A Critical Reflection on Whether a Collaborative Orientation Can Be Ethically Incorporated into the Practice of Law, was cited in the following December 2016 updated treatise: 1 Handling Child Custody, Abuse and Adoption Cases § 6:16, § 4:29
  1. Professor Spain’s Collaborative Law: A Critical Reflection on Whether a Collaborative Orientation Can Be Ethically Incorporated into the Practice of Law, was cited in the following Iowa practice series: 16 Ia. Prac., Lawyer and Judicial Ethics § 5:2(c)(4)
  1. Professor Chiappinelli’s article The Myth of Director Consent: After Shaffer, Beyond Nicastro, was cited in the following December 2016 updated treatise: 11 Bus. & Com. Litig. Fed. Cts. § 116:21 (4th ed.)
  1. Professor Chiappinelli’s article The Myth of Director Consent: After Shaffer, Beyond Nicastro was cited in the following article: John F. Preis, The Dormant Commerce Clause As a Limit on Personal Jurisdiction, 102 Iowa L. Rev. 121 (2016)
  1. Professor Shannon’s article co-authored with Teel Bivins, John T. Montford, Todd A. Hunter, Rob Junell, Robert L. Duncan, The 1995 Revisions to the DTPA: Altering the Landscape, was cited by the following updated treatise: 2 McDonald & Carlson, Civ. Prac. § 6:19 (2d. ed.)
  1. Professor Loewy’s article A Proposal for the Universal Collection of DNA was cited in: Christopher Slobogin, Policing as Administration, 165 Pa. L. Rev. 91 (2016)
  1. Professor R. Sherwin’s article, Clones, Thugs, “N (Eventual?) Harmony: Using the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure to Simulate A Statutory Defamation Defense and Make the World Safe from Copyright Bullies, was cited in: Briana Lynn Rosenbaum, The Rico Trend in Class Action Warfare, 102 Iowa L. Rev. 165 (2016)
  1. Professor Loewy’s article, Taking Bakke Seriously: Distinguishing Diversity from Affirmative Action in the Law School Admissions Process, was cited in: 2 Successful Partnering Between Inside and Outside Counsel § 39:7, § 39:83
  1. Dean Dickerson’s article Bailor Beware: Limitations and Exclusions of Liability in Commercial Bailments was cited in the following December updated treatise: 21 Prac. Contract Law and Practice § 1:5
  1. Dean Dickerson’s article Deposition Dilemmas: Vexatious Scheduling and Errata Sheets, was cited in: 14 Wash. Prac. Civil Procedure § 21:38 (2d ed.)
  1. Professor Weninger’s article Amended Federal Rule of Evidence 408: Trapping the Unwary, was cited in: 5A Wash. Prac., Evidence Law and Practice § 408.12 (6th ed.)
  1. Dean Dickerson’s article Cyberbullies on Campus, was cited in Nisha Chandran, Crossing the Line: When Cyberbullying Prevention Operates As A Prior Restraint on Student Speech, Ill. J.L. Tech. & Pol’y 277 (2016)
  1. Professor Murphy’s and Sidney Shapiro’s article, Politicized Judicial Review in Administrative Law: Three Improbable Responses, was cited in the following article: William Ortman, Rulemaking’s Missing Tier, 68 L. Rev. 225 (2016)
  1. Professor Loewy’s article, Morals Legislation and the Establishment Clause, was cited in: David R. Williams, Jr., In Defense of the Secular Purpose Status Quo, 102 L. Rev. 2075 (2016)
  1. Professor Loewy’s article, The Fourth Amendment As A Device for Protecting the Innocent, was cited in: Nicole B. Cásarez, The Synergy of Privacy and Speech, 18 Pa. J. Const. L. 813 (2016)
  1. Professor Casto’s article, Advising Presidents: Robert Jackson and the Destroyers for Bases Deal, was cited in: Daniel Bodansky & Peter Spiro, Executive Agreements+, 49 J. Transnat’l L. 885 (2016)
  1. Professor Murphy’s & Sidney A. Shapiro, Eight Things Americans Can’t Figure out About Controlling Administrative Power, was cited in: Emily S. Bremer, American and European Perspectives on Private Standards in Public Law, 91 L. Rev. 325 (2016)
  1. Professor Murphy’s & Afsheen J. Radsan article, The Evolution of Law and Policy for CIA Targeted Killing, was cited in: Jasmine Khoshnou, Game of Drones: The Use of Armed Drones from a Game Theory Perspective, Interdisc. L. Rev. 191 (2016)
  1. Professor Beyer’s article The Will Execution Ceremony–History, Significance, and Strategies, was cited in: Alexander A. Boni-Saenz, Sexual Advance Directives, 68 L. Rev. 1 (2016)
  1. Professor Casto’s book, The Supreme Court in the Early Republic: The Chief Justiceships of John Jay and Oliver Ellsworth, was cited in: Joel Fishman, Third Circuit Court Reports (1789-1879), 108 Law Libr. J. 623 (2016)
  1. Professor Beyer’s West legal forms were adapted to Indiana Practice Series forms, 5 Ind. Prac., Essential Forms § 9:1.1.50,§ 9:1.1.70, § 9:4.1.2, §9:6.1.50 (2016)

Quoted:

  1. Professor Beyer’s article Pay to the Order of Whom?-the Case of the Ambiguous Multiple Payee Designation, was quoted in: 2A Ill. Prac., UCC with Illinois Code Comments § 5/3-110
  1. Professor Black’s book Family Law in Utah, 2d Ed. was quoted in: 2 Utah Prac., Utah Family Law § 30-1-4.5, 3-5 (2016 ed.)
  1. Professor Camp’s article, The Failure of Adversarial Process in the Administrative State, was quoted in: Jessica K. Steinberg, Adversary Breakdown and Judicial Role Confusion in “Small Case” Civil Justice, 2016 Y.U.L. Rev. 899 (2016)
  1. Professor Loewy’s article, The Fourth Amendment as a Device for Protecting the Innocent, was quoted in: Richard M. Re, Imagining Perfect Surveillance, 64 UCLA L. Rev. Discourse 264 (2016)
  1. Professor Loewy’s article, The Supreme Court, Confessions, and Judicial Schizophrenia, was quoted in: 35 No. 18 Whited, Drinking/Driving Law Letter NL 1

News:

  1. On November 29 2016, Prof. Gerry W. Beyer spoke to the Fredericksburg chapter of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. His well-attended presentation was entitled Planning Your Estate – “I Didn’t Know That!” His presentation was also simulcast to Marble Falls, Texas.
  1. Professor Rosen was quoted in a Stars and Stripes news article from December 13, 2016 titled “A Pardon for Bowe Bergdahl? Unlikely, experts say” which can be found here.

CCH Secured Transactions Guide: What is it?

This is the first post in a four-part series spotlighting CCH Secured Transactions Guide.

CCH Secured Transactions Guide is a comprehensive source of secured transaction materials. This resource is accessible through the electronic database tab on the Texas Tech Law Library Website. However, you must first create log-in credentials to access CCH sources. 

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The Secured Transactions main page provides you with links to several resources. It has the full text of the Uniform Commercial Code and state variations. It also allows you to make the Secured Transactions Guide your starting library when logging into CCH.

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Access to CCH Secured Transactions Guide Monitor database is available through the Texas Tech Law Library website under the Electronic Databases tab. You must register and create an individual user ID using a TTU email address as your user ID. You choose your own password. Please contact a Law Librarian if you have any questions.

 

Library Student Services: Spring 2017

As always, the library is offering many services for TTU law students this spring.  Please take advantage of any or all of these, and stop by any time you need any research-related help!

  1. Excellence in Legal Research Program:  Our award-winning ELR program is always open for registration.  Follow our Facebook page or Twitter page for reminders of upcoming classes so you are not one of those new hires that has your boss bemoaning your lack of research skills.  Go here for the full spring ELR schedule.
  2. Scholarly research help:  Last semester, we wanted to make big strides in helping students with their scholarly writing endeavors.  If you’re writing a seminar paper this semester or just trying to finish up your student note, contact Alyson Drake to set up an appointment.  We met with more than 40 seminar and/or journal students last semester to help with selecting research topics, conducting efficient and authoritative legal research, organizing the structure of papers, and perfecting those Bluebook sessions–and many of those students reported getting A’s on their seminar papers!  For additional scholarly research help, stop by one of the Scribes Student Writing Group events (the first one is next Thursday, January 26th on help with topic selection).
  3. Citation assistance and journal resources help: If you’re checking sources for law review or a specialty journal and are having trouble locating materials cited, please stop by Prof. Drake’s office or stop by the Circulation Desk between 8:00am and 5:00pm and ask for the librarian on call.  We can also help you figure out those weird Bluebook citations.
  4. Research help: Are you participating in one of TTU Law’s clinic this semester?  Are you working part time for a law firm?  If you get stuck researching an issue, don’t spin your wheels!  See the on-call librarian or email us at reference.law@ttu.edu.
  5. Topical research presentations: Are you the president of one of TTU Law’s many student groups?  We’re happy to set up a presentation on resources relevant to your group.  Last spring, we did topical presentations on health law, business & bankruptcy, and family law resources for TTU student groups.  Contact Prof. Drake if you’d like to set up a presentation for your group

Don’t hesitate to contact us if there’s anything you need.  The library is here to help!