Library Events March Madness Students

March Madness (3/3/18)-Ruth Bader Ginsburg v. Amy Klobuchar

Today’s head-to-head is between Amy Klobuchar, the first female senator of Minnesota, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the first female Jewish Justice of the Supreme Court. Which woman inspires you the most? You can vote by participating in our daily Twitter or Facebook poll, or by casting a vote at the Circulation Desk.  Happy voting!

Amy Klobuchar-“We’ve got great potential in our country and the only way we’re going to make sure kids are getting the degrees that they need, make sure we’re getting through that red tape, is by working together.”

Klobuchar
Image via Wikipedia.

After graduating valedictorian of her high school, Amy went to college at Yale University. While there, she interned for a senator before turning her time towards her 150 page senior thesis. She graduated magna cum laude before entering the University Of Chicago Law School. Amy worked as a prosecutor and corporate lawyer prior to having her child, when she was forced by the hospital to leave less than 24 hours after giving birth when her daughter could not swallow. She spent time advocating the Minnesota State legislature for a bill that would guarantee new mothers a 48 hour hospital stay at least and eventually this exact bill was made a federal policy. She was the county attorney for Hennepin County for 8 years before running for the United States Senate. After beating her opponents, Amy became the first female senator from Minnesota and continues to sit on the Senate now. She has consistently advocated for healthcare reform and for civil liberties. Additionally, she was one of the biggest voices calling for the investigation of President Trump’s financial and political ties to Russia during and after his election.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg-“Fight for the things that you care about, but do it in a way that will lead others to join you.”

Ginsburg
Image via Oyez.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was the only surviving child of two Jewish immigrants and her mother encouraged Justice Ginsburg’s education from a very young age. After marrying and giving birth to her first child, Justice Ginsburg enrolled at Harvard University, where she was immediately introduced to and discouraged by the male views of her gender in the legal profession. After experiencing many forms of gender discrimination personally, including being told she would be paid less as a law professor because she had a husband with a decent job, Justice Ginsburg became one of the most well-known advocates and legal researchers for women’s rights. She argued several times successfully to the all-male Supreme Court of the United States and her successes as a whole discouraged legislatures from treating women and men differently. After serving as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals, President Clinton appointed Justice Ginsburg as the second female justice on the Supreme Court and the first female Jewish Justice. Justice Ginsburg used her position to continue the fight for women’s rights, upholding the Roe v. Wade decision and criticizing any legislation or cases that limited the ability of women to make their own decisions.

Disclaimer: This is a friendly competition that is meant to increase awareness about some amazing women. The match ups were determined by a random outcome generator, and the winner will be determined based solely on the votes submitted by the participants. We are in no way seeking to pit one woman against each other in any inappropriate way, because each woman is inspiring in her own right.

Alyson Drake is the Assistant Director for Public Services and the Director of the Excellence in Legal Research Program at Texas Tech University Law School, where she also teaches courses in Texas Legal Research, and Foreign, Comparative, and International Legal Research and administers the Legal Practice Program's research workshops. She blogs at www.legalresearchpedagogy.com.

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