March 2019 New Books

2017 March

In March 2019, the Law Library added the following new titles to the collection to support the research and curricular needs of our faculty and students.

CONTRACTS

  1. Edward Yorio and Steve Thel, Contract Enforcement: Specific Performance and Injunctions (2011).

CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE

  1. Paul H. Robinson and Tyler Scot Williams, Mapping American Criminal Law: Variations Across the 50 States (2018).

CYBER LAW

  1. Jack Caravelli and Nigel Jones, Cyber Security: Threats and Responses for Government and Business (2019).

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

  1. Celine Tan and Julio Faundez, eds., Natural Resources and Sustainable Development: International Economic Law Perspectives (2017).

INDIAN AND ABORIGINAL LAW

  1. Leilani Sabzalian, Indigenous Children’s Survivance in Public Schools (2019).

INFORMATION PRIVACY

  1. Radim Polcak and Dan Jerker B. Svantesson, Information Sovereignty: Data Privacy, Sovereign Powers and the Rule of Law (2017).

INSURANCE LAW

  1. Michael Menapace, et. al., eds., The Handbook on Additional Insureds (2018).

INTERNATIONAL LAW

  1. Young Sok Kim, The Law of the International Criminal Court (2019).

LEGAL ANALYSIS AND WRITING

  1. Marta Mestrovic Deyrup, Librarian’s Guide to Writing for Professional Publication (2019).
  2. Joel P. Trachtman, The Tools of Argument: How the Best Lawyers Think, Argue, and Win (2013).

LEGAL HISTORY

  1. Richard H. Underwood, Gaslight Lawyers: Criminal Trials & Exploits in Gilded Age New York (2017).

LEGAL RESEARCH AND LIBRARIES

  1. William H. Manz, ed., Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act of 2015: A Legislative History of Public Law No. 114-125 (2017).

LIBRARIES

  1. Jessica Zellers, Tina M. Adams, and Katherine Hill, The ABCs of ERM: Demystifying Electronic Resource Management for Public and Academic Librarians (2018).
  2. Frances C. Wilkinson, Linda K. Lewis, and Rebecca L. Lubas, The Complete Guide to Acquisitions Management (2015).
  3. Carmen Cowick, Crash Course in Disaster Preparedness (2018).
  4. Emy Nelson Decker and Seth M. Porter, Engaging Design: Creating Libraries for Modern Users (2018).

NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

  1. Bruce R. Hopkins, The Law of Tax-Exempt Organizations (2019).

All of these books are available from the Law Library.  If you would like to check out any of these titles, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu.  Library staff will be able to assist in locating and checking out any of these items.

March 2019 Law Faculty Publications & News

Throughout the month of March, the Law Library received alerts for full-time TTU Law Faculty publications and news. Below is a compilation of those daily alerts for March 1st to March 31st, 2019.

Articles

1. Arnold H. Loewy, Why Capital Punishment Should Be Abolished, 51 TEX. TECH L. REV. 31 (2018).

2. Gerry W. Beyer, The Consequences of Cashing-In on Death, JOTWELL (March 27, 2019) (reviewing David Horton, Borrowing in the Shadow of Death: Another Look at Probate Lending, 59 WM. & MARY L. REV. 2447 (2018)), https://trustest.jotwell.com/the-consequences-of-cashing-in-on-death/.

3. Brie D. Sherwin, The Upside Down: A New Reality for Science at the EPA and Its Impact on Environmental Justice, 27 N.Y.U. ENVTL. L.J. 57 (2019).

4. Gerry W. Beyer & Brooke Dacus, Estate Planning for Mary Jane and Other Marijuana Users, PROB. & PROP., Mar./Apr. 2019, at 17.

5. Dustin B. Benham, E-Discovery: Direct Access of Electronic Devices After in Re Marion Shipman, 82 TEX. B.J. 168 (2019).

6. Gerry W. Beyer, Keeping Current—Probate, PROB. & PROP., Mar./Apr. 2019, at 22.

7. Alyson M. Drake, On Embracing the Research Conference, 111 LAW LAW LIBR. J. 7 (2019).

8. Bryan T. Camp, Lesson From The Tax Court: No Human Review Needed For Automated Penalties?, TAXPROF BLOG (March 4, 2019), https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2019/03/lesson-from-the-tax-court-no-human-review-needed-for-automated-penalties.html.

Op-Ed

1. Arnold Loewy & Charles Moster, It’s debatable: Can the president ignore an order from the U.S. Supreme Court?, LUBBOCK AVALANCHE-J. (March 3, 2019 at 1:01 a.m.), https://www.lubbockonline.com/news/20190303/its-debatable-can-president-ignore-order-from-us-supreme-court.

2. Arnold Loewy & Charles Moster, It’s debatable: Does president’s conduct rise to impeachable level of ‘high crimes and misdemeanors?’, LUBBOCK AVALANCHE-J. (March 22, 2019 at 8:00 p.m.), https://www.lubbockonline.com/news/20190322/its-debatable-does-presidents-conduct-rise-to-impeachable-level-of-high-crimes-and-misdemeanors.

Citations

1. Prof. Alex Pearl’s article How to be an Authentic Indian is cited in the following article: Jason Zenor, Tribal (De)termination? Commercial Speech, Native American Imagery and Cultural Sovereignty, 48 SW. L. REV. 81 (2019).

2. Prof. Casto’s book THE SUPREME COURT IN THE EARLY REPUBLIC: THE CHIEF JUSTICESHIPS OF JOHN JAY AND OLIVER ELLSWORTH is cited in the following article: Jud Campbell, The Invention of First Amendment Federalism, 97 TEX. L. REV. 517 (2019).

3. Prof. Robert Sherwin’s article Evidence? We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Evidence!: How Ambiguity in Some States’ Anti-SLAPP Laws Threatens to De-Fang a Popular and Powerful Weapon Against Frivolous Litigation is cited in the following article: Clay Calvert et al., Defamation Per Se and Transgender Status: When Macro-Level Value Judgments About Equality Trump Micro-Level Reputational Injury, 85 TENN. L. REV. 1029 (2018).

4. Prof. Robert Sherwin’s article Ambiguity in Anti-SLAPP Law and Frivolous Litigation is cited in the following article: George Wyeth et al., The Impact of Citizen Environmental Science in the United States, 49 ELR 10237 (2019).

5. Prof. Soonpaa’s article Stress in Law Students: A Comparative Study of First-Year, Second-Year, and Third-Year Students is cited in the following article: Rebecca Flanagan, Better by Design: Implementing Meaningful Change for the Next Generation of Law Students, 71 ME. L. REV. 103 (2018).

6. Prof. Camp’s article Theory and Practice in Tax Administration is cited in the following article: Michael Hatfield, Cybersecurity and Tax Reform, 93 IND. L.J. 1161 (2018).

7. Prof. Christopher’s article Whack-A-Mole: Why Prosecuting Digital Currency Exchanges Won’t Stop Online Money Laundering is cited in the following article: Margaret Ryznar, The Future of Bitcoin Futures, 56 HOUS. L. REV. 539 (2019).

8. Prof. Christopher’s article The Bridging Model: Exploring the Roles of Trust and Enforcement in Banking, Bitcoin, and the Blockchain is cited in the following article: Margaret Ryznar, The Future of Bitcoin Futures, 56 HOUS. L. REV. 539 (2019).

9. Prof. Ramirez’s article Iraq War: Anticipatory Self-Defense or Unlawful Unilateralism is cited in the following article: Nancy Amoury Combs, Unequal Enforcement of the Law: Targeting Aggressors for Mass Atrocity Prosecutions, 61 ARIZ. L. REV. 155 (2019).

10. Prof. Tracy Pearl’s article Crowd Crush: How the Law Leaves American Crowds Unprotected is cited in the following article: Joseph Mendoza, Controlled Chaos: A Proposal for an International Code of Conduct in the Live Concert Context, 25 SW. J. INT’L L. 180 (2019).

11. Prof. Beyer’s TEACHING MATERIALS ON ESTATE PLANNING is cited in the following article: William A. Drennan, Contracts of the Dead: When Should They Haunt the Living?, 49 N.M.L. REV. 1 (2019).

12. Prof. Rosen’s article Funding “Non-Traditional” Military Operations: The Alluring Myth of a Presidential Power of the Purse is cited in the following article: Zachary J. Broughton, Constitutional Law-I Beg Your Pardon: Ex Parte Garland Overruled; the Presidential Pardon Is No Longer Unlimited, 41 W. NEW ENG. L. REV. 183 (2019).

13. Prof. Casto’s article There Were Great Men Before Agamemnon is cited in the following article: Khagesh Gautam, The Use of International Law in Constitutional Interpretation in the Supreme Court of India, 55 STAN. J. INT’L L. 27 (2019).

14. Prof. Casto’s article “Dear Sister Antillico …”: The Story of Kirksey v. Kirksey is cited in the following article: Charles Calleros & Val Ricks, Kirksey v. Kirksey, 45 FLA. ST. U.L. REV. 965 (2018).

Quotes

1. Prof. Cochran is quoted throughout the following article: Matt Schmitto, Texas Bet ‘Em: Students, Locals Active in the Black Market as Legislature Folds Hand, ROTOGRINDERS (March 5, 2019), https://rotogrinders.com/sports-betting/texas-illegal-sports-betting-black-market-lubbock.

2. Prof. Metze is quoted in the following article: Caitlin Randle, Law professors discuss what to expect if officer’s shooting case goes to trial, MIDLAND REPORTER-TELEGRAM, (March 7, 2019), https://www.mrt.com/news/article/Law-professors-discuss-what-to-expect-if-13669344.php.

3. Prof. Camp is quoted in the following article: Laura Saunders, An Answer to a SALT-y Tax Problem You Didn’t Know You Had, WALL ST. J. (March 22, 2019), https://www.wsj.com/articles/an-answer-to-a-salt-y-tax-problem-you-didnt-know-you-had-11553247005.

News

1. On March 1st, Professor Gerry W. Beyer was the leadoff speaker at the 11th Annual Estate Planning & Community Property Law Journal CLE & Expo held at the Texas Tech University School of Law. His presentation included a discussion of judicial developments relating to the Texas law of intestacy, wills, estate administration, trusts, and other estate planning matters.

2. On March 16th, Professor Victoria Sutton gave a presentation entitled Indigenous Science –Why We Need It at the AISES Leadership Conference in Cherokee, North Carolina. The American Indian Science and Engineering Society is a non-profit professional association with the goal of substantially increasing American Indian, Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, First Nation, and other indigenous peoples of North America representation in the fields of science, technology, engineering, math, and related disciplines.

3. Professor Alyson Drake is featured this month on the American Association of Law Libraries’ Member Profile. Interview available here: https://www.aallnet.org/member-profile/alyson-drake/.

4. Professor Rishi Batra was selected as an Integrated Scholar for 2019, one of only six faculty members from across Texas Tech University to be so recognized. The Integrated Scholars program identifies faculty who dedicate themselves to a course of lifelong learning and advance Texas Tech’s role in educating, serving, and inspiring others to do the same.

5. On March 22nd, Professor Baker was the featured speaker at the Northern California Association of Law Libraries’ Spring Institute in San Francisco, California. She spoke about the ethical use of artificial intelligence in legal information structures.

6. On March 22nd, Professor Victoria Sutton presented at the Southeastern Indian Studies Conference at UNC-Pembroke. Her talk was entitled Paper Genocide of Indians in North Carolina.

7. On March 26th, Professor Jamie Baker was a panelist representing academic law libraries in a national webinar sponsored by the American Association of Law Libraries. She discussed artificial intelligence and machine learning in legal research.

8. On March 28th, Professor Gerry W. Beyer was an invited speaker at the Spring Judicial Education Session sponsored by the Texas Association of Counties in Lubbock. To an audience of over 100 county court judges, Prof. Beyer presented his paper entitled Alternatives to Regular Probate.

9. On March 29th, Professor Tracy Pearl presented at the Texas Tech Law Review’s 13th Annual Criminal Law Symposium. Topics covered included police interrogation practices, coerced confessions, and the 5th Amendment.

10. On March 30th, Professor Victoria Sutton gave a presentation entitled Designer Babies and National Security at Stanford Law’s annual “Biolawlapalooza” Conference.

SCOTUS Online Tools: CQ Supreme Court Collection

This is the fourth in a four part series highlighting Supreme Court online tools.  Each segment of this series will introduce a different online tool relating to the Supreme Court.

The fourth tool that will be highlighted is CQ Supreme Court Collection.  This tool is a website that monitors, records, and keeps track of recent Supreme Court cases, the Supreme Court Justices, and current news regarding the Supreme Court. This tool can be conveniently accessed here.

Below is what the homepage looks like.

cq1

The “Cases” feature allows you to browse cases by Justice, case name, date range, or even by key words within a case.

cq2

The “Justices” tab allows you to search Justices based on their name, term, or opinions they authored.

cq3

The “Analyze Data” tool allows users to compare and analyze Justice Roles, Opinion Alignment, Opinion Writing, and Voting Bloc Analysis.

cq4

Finally, “The Court Explained” breaks down key aspects of the Supreme Court’s role and the Constitution.

cq5

Check out CQ Supreme Court Collection to explore some fun features that will assist in learning more and staying up-to-date about current Supreme Court cases.

February 2019 New Resources

2019 Feb new books

In February 2019, the Law Library added the following new resources to the collection to support the research and curricular needs of our faculty and students.

New Resources

GAO Reports and Comptroller General Decisions – A new database available from HeinOnline.  Contains reports on audits, surveys, investigations, and evaluations of federal programs conducted by the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO). All published reports, testimonies, correspondence, and special publications are included (documents that are restricted or classified are not). GAO Comptroller General Decisions contain decisions and opinions issued by the Comptroller General in areas of federal law such as appropriations, bid protests, and federal agency rulemaking.

New Books

COMPARATIVE AND FOREIGN LAW

  1. Gary Slapper and David Kelly, The English Legal System (2014).
  2. P.S.R.F. Mathijsen, A Guide to European Union Law: As Amended by the Treaty of Lisbon (2010).
  3. Lorna Woods and Philippa Watson, Steiner & Woods EU Law (2012).

CYBER LAW

  1. Catherine D. Marcum, Cyber Crime (2019).

DOMESTIC RELATIONS

  1. Brett R. Turner, Equitable Distribution of Property (2019).
  2. Diane L. Redleaf, They Took the Kids Last Night: How the Child Protection System Puts Families at Risk (2018).

EMPLOYMENT PRACTICE

  1. Meera E. Deo, Unequal Profession: Race and Gender in Legal Academia (2019).
  2. Wendi S. Lazar, executive ed. ; Terese M. Connolly and Gregory S. Chiarello eds., Zero Tolerance: Best Practices for Combating Sex-Based Harassment in the Legal Profession (2018).

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

  1. Mark A. Ryan, ed., The Clean Water Act Handbook (2018).
  2. Harry Verhoeven, ed., Environmental Politics in the Middle East: Local Struggles, Global Connections (2018).
  3. Shelley Ross Saxer and Jonathan Rosenbloom, Social-Ecological Resilience and Sustainability (2018).

IMMIGRATION LAW

  1. ILRC Staff Attorneys, Essentials of Asylum Law (2018).

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

  1. Irene Calboli and Martin Senftleben, eds., The Protection of Non-Traditional Trademarks: Critical Perspectives (2018).

LEGAL ANALYSIS AND WRITING

  1. Jill Barton and Rachel H. Smith, The Handbook for the New Legal Writer (2019).

LEGAL EDUCATION

  1. Helen Sword, Air & Light & Time & Space: How Successful Academics Write (2017).
  2. Gary R. Morrison, Designing Effective Instruction (2013).
  3. Christine Harrington and Todd Zakrajsek, Dynamic Lecturing: Research-Based Strategies to Enhance Lecture Effectiveness (2017).
  4. Robert F. Mager, Preparing Instructional Objectives: A Critical Tool in the Development of Effective Instruction (2012).

LEGAL PROFESSION

  1. Faith Pincus, Being Heard: Presentation Skills for Attorneys (2018).
  2. Jeremy W. Richter, Building a Better Law Practice: Become a Better Lawyer in Five Minutes a Day (2018).
  3. Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together (2018).
  4. Ida O. Abbott, The Lawyer’s Guide to Mentoring (2018).
  5. Andy Clark, Lawyer Wellness is Not an Oxymoron: Why Tomorrow’s Top Lawyers Must Embrace Wellness Today and What You Need to do to be One of Them (2013).
  6. Larry Port and Dave Maxfield, The Lean Law Firm: Run Your Firm Like the World’s Most Efficient and Profitable Businesses (2018).
  7. Lee Holcomb, Lifestyle Lawyer: The Female Attorney’s Guide to Designing a Law Career You Love (2018).

PROFESSIONAL ETHICS

  1. Katerina P. Lewinbuk, Connecting Ethics and Practice: A Lawyer’s Guide to Professional Responsibility (2019).

SMALL BUSINESS LAW

  1. Jean L. Batman, Advising the Small Business: Forms and Advice for the Legal Practitioner (2018).

TRIAL PRACTICE

  1. David Berg, The Trial Lawyer: What it Takes to Win (2018).

All resources are available from the Law Library.  If you would like to check out any of these titles, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu.

All electronic databases are available through the Library’s webpage, http://www.depts.ttu.edu/law/lawlibrary/index.php.

Library staff will be able to assist in locating and checking out any of these items or helping you contact the Librarian on call for questions about electronic resources.

February 2019 Law Faculty Publications & News

Throughout the month of February, the Law Library received alerts for full-time TTU Law Faculty publications and news. Below is a compilation of those daily alerts for February 1st to February 28th, 2019.

Books & Treatises

1. 12, 12A, 12B GERRY W. BEYER, WEST’S TEXAS FORMS – DECEDENTS’ ESTATES AND GUARDIANSHIPS (4th ed. 2019).

2. WILLIAM R. CASTO, ADVISING THE PRESIDENT: ATTORNEY GENERAL ROBERT H. JACKSON AND FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT (2018).

Articles

1. Richard W. Murphy, Chenery’s Contemporaneous Rationale Principle and Chenery Cheating, ADMIN. & REG. L. NEWS 20 (2018).

2. Gerry W. Beyer, Cryptocurrency—What Estate Planners Need to Know, EST. PLAN. DEV. FOR TEX. PROF., Feb. 2019, at 1.

Op-Eds

1. Arnold Loewy & Charles Moster, It’s Debatable: When is it OK to shut down the federal government?, LUBBOCK AVALANCHE-J (Feb. 3, 2019 at 1:01 a.m.), https://www.lubbockonline.com/news/20190203/its-debatable-when-is-it-ok-to-shut-down-federal-government/1.

2. Arnold Loewy & Charles Moster, It’s Debatable: Does southern border issue rise to level of national emergency?, LUBBOCK AVALANCHE-J (Feb. 17, 2019 at 1:01 a.m.), https://www.lubbockonline.com/news/20190217/its-debatable-does-southern-border-issue-rise-to-level-of-national-emergency.

Citations

1. Prof. Robert Sherwin’s article Evidence? We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Evidence!: How Ambiguity in Some States’ Anti-SLAPP Laws Threatens to Defang a Popular and Powerful Weapon Against Frivolous Litigation is cited in the following article: Julio Sharp-Wasserman, Section 230(c)(1) of the Communications Decency Act and the Common Law of Defamation: A Convergence Thesis, 20 COLUM. SCI. & TECH. L. REV. 195 (2018).

2. Prof. Tracy Pearl’s article Fast & Furious: The Misregulation of Driverless Cars is cited in the following article: Lawrence J. Trautman, How Google Perceives Customer Privacy, Cyber, E-Commerce, Political and Regulatory Compliance Risks, 10 WM. & MARY BUS. L. REV. 1 (2018).

3. Prof. Casto’s article America’s First Independent Counsel: The Planned Criminal Prosecution of Chief Justice John Jay is cited in the following article: John C. Yoo, The Executive Power of Reversal, 42 HARV. J.L. & PUB. POL’Y 59 (2019).

4. Prof. Murphy’s article Politicized Judicial Review in Administrative Law: Three Improbable Responses is cited in the following article: Kate Andrias, An American Approach to Social Democracy: The Forgotten Promise of the Fair Labor Standards Act, 128 YALE L.J. 616 (2019).

5. Prof. Gonzalez’s article At the Intersection of Religious Organization Missions and Employment Laws: The Case of Minister Employment Suits is cited in the following article: Charles A. Sullivan, Clergy Contracts, 22 EMP. RTS. & EMP. POL’Y J. 371 (2018).

6. Prof. Camp’s article Tax Administration as Inquisitorial Process and the Partial Paradigm Shift in the IRS Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998 is cited in the following article: Alexandra D. Lahav & Peter Siegelman, The Curious Incident of the Falling Win Rate: Individual vs System-Level Justification and the Rule of Law, 52 U.C. DAVIS L. REV. 1373 (2019).

7. Prof. Benham’s article Proportionality, Pretrial Confidentiality, and Discovery Sharing is cited in the following article: Seth Katsuya Endo, Discovery Hydraulics, 52 U.C. DAVIS L. REV. 1319 (2019).

8. Prof. Beyer’s articles The Will Execution Ceremony and Avoiding the Estate Planning “Blue Screen of Death”: Common Non-Tax Errors and How to Prevent Them are cited in the following article: Megan McIntyre, I Knew Him As My Daughter: The Impact of Gender Changes on Sex-Based Benefits from Class Gifts, 11 EST. PLAN. & COMMUNITY PROP. L.J. 191 (2018).

9. Prof. Beyer’s article Avoid Being a Defendant: Estate Planning Malpractice and Ethical Concerns is cited in the following article: Raymond C. O’Brien, Equitable Relief for ERISA Benefit Plan Designation Mistakes, 67 CATH. U.L. REV. 433 (2018).

10. Prof. Camp’s article More on the Successful Challenge to the Anti-Inversion Regulations is cited in the following article: Stephanie Hunter McMahon, Tax As Part of A Broken Budget: Good Taxes Are Good Cause Enough, 2018 MICH. ST. L. REV. 513 (2018).

11. Prof. Christopher’s article Whack-a-Mole: Why Prosecuting Digital Currency Exchanges Won’t Stop Online Laundering is cited in the following article: Lawrence J. Trautman, Bitcoin, Virtual Currencies, and the Struggle of Law and Regulation to Keep Pace, 102 MARQ. L. REV. 447 (2018).

12. Prof. Brie Sherwin’s article Pride and Prejudice and Administrative Zombies: How Economic Woes, Outdated Environmental Regulations and State Exceptionalism Failed Flint, Michigan is cited in the following article: Lauren Madison, Substantive Due Process As Recourse for Flint Water Crisis Plaintiffs, 64 WAYNE L. REV. 531 (2019).

13. Prof. Shannon’s article Incompetency to be Executed: Conditions Ethical Challenges & Time for A Change in Texas is cited in the following article: Chinyerum N. Okpara, Forced into Execution: Involuntarily Medicating Mentally Ill Inmates to Achieve Competency for Execution, 43 T. MARSHALL L. REV. ONLINE 2 (2019).

14. Prof. Casto’s book THE SUPREME COURT IN THE EARLY REPUBLIC: THE CHIEF JUSTICESHIPS OF JOHN JAY AND OLIVER ELLSWORTH is cited in the following article: Judd Campbell, The Invention of First Amendment Federalism, 97 TEX. L. REV. 518 (2019).

15. Prof. Spain’s article Public Interest Law: Improving Access to Justice: The Opportunities and Challenges of Providing Equal Access to Justice in Rural Communities is cited in the following article: Lisa R. Pruitt et. al., Legal Deserts: A Multi-State Perspective on Rural Access to Justice, 13 HARV. L. & POL’Y REV. 15 (2018).

16. Prof. Robert Sherwin’s article Ambiguity in Anti-SLAPP Law and Frivolous Litigation is cited in the following article: Lauren Bergelson, The Need for A Federal Anti-SLAPP Law in Today’s Digital Media Climate, 42 COLUM. J.L. & ARTS 213 (2019).

Quotes

1. Prof. Loewy is quoted in the following article: Emma Sipple, Shield law on federal level discussed by experts, DAILY TOREADOR (Feb. 24, 2019), http://www.dailytoreador.com/news/shield-law-on-federal-level-discussed-by-experts/article_31bd65b2-388a-11e9-b9af-77296678ad7a.html.

News

1. On February 6th, Professor Dwight McDonald kicked off this year’s Black History Month Lecture Series with a presentation entitled Why Black History is American History. The talk focused on the cultural, scientific, political, and economic contributions of African Americans, and how these contributions are simultaneously worthy of independent celebration and inextricably woven into a singular American story.

2. On February 8th, Professor Gerry Beyer was an invited speaker at the 2019 Mid-Year Meeting of the Arkansas Bar Association in Little Rock. Attendees were treated to presentations on Cyber Estate Planning and Administration and Anticipating Wills Contests and How to Avoid Them. Prof. Beyer also prepared extensive articles on both topics to accompany his presentations.

3. On February 13th, Professor Gerry Beyer gave a presentation for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute in Lubbock, Texas. His presentation was entitled What Do You Desire? Will Bequests: A Person’s Last Chance to be Creative!

4. On February 21st, Professor Gerry Beyer was a speaker for the South Plains Trust and Estate Council in Lubbock. To a multi-disciplinary audience of attorneys, CPAs, trust officers, financial planners, life insurance specialists, and Tech law students, Prof. Beyer presented his paper entitled Morals from the Courthouse: A Study of Recent Texas Cases Impacting the Wills, Probate, and Trust Practice.

5. On February 22nd, Professor Gerry W. Beyer travelled to Abilene to give a presentation for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. His presentation was entitled What Do You Desire? Will Bequests: A Person’s Last Chance to be Creative!

6. On February 23rd-24th, Professor Victoria Sutton conducted a “Biohacker Legal Clinic” at the BDYHX 2019 Conference in Austin. BDYHX is a conference covering the topics of human augmentation, transhumanism, and biohacking.

7. On February 26th, Professor Gerry Beyer was a speaker for a national webinar co-sponsored by the American Law Institute and the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. Speaking alongside Bruce Stone and Suzanne Brown Walsh, the panel was entitled Technology and Estate Planning: The Rise of the Electronic Will.

SCOTUS Online Tools: Oyez.org

This is the third in a four part series highlighting Supreme Court online tools.  Each segment of this series will introduce a different online tool relating to the Supreme Court.

The third tool that will be highlighted is Oyez.org.  This tool is a website that monitors, records, and keeps track of recent Supreme Court cases, the Supreme Court Justices, and current news regarding the Supreme Court. This tool can be conveniently accessed here.

Below is what the homepage looks like.

oyez1

There are four navigation options from the homepage.  The first, “Cases” will take you to current Supreme Court cases during the present and past terms.

oyez2

You can also view cases by issue instead of term, and the term can be changed.  Oyez, provides access for cases back to 1789.

Next, you can navigate to “Justices”. Here you can read about each Justice that has ever served on the Supreme Court.

oyez3

The “Tour” feature allows you to take a virtual tour of the Supreme Court.

oyez4

Finally, clicking “News” will navigate you to “ISCOTUS Now” a blog-news site managed and maintained by IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law.

oyez5

Check out Oyez.org to read Supreme Court cases old and new, find out all the Supreme Court Justices since the court’s inception, take a tour of the Supreme Court without spending a dime and finally learn about what’s happening besides cases in the world of the Supreme Court!

January 2019 New Books

2019 Jan new books

In January 2019, the Law Library added the following new titles to the collection to support the research and curricular needs of our faculty and students.

CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE

  1. Victoria Sutton, The Court Martial of Apache Kid Based on the Original Transcript (2018).
  2. James Nesci, How to Beat a DUI (2008).

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

  1. Robert Henson, The Thinking Person’s Guide to Climate Change (2014).

HEALTH LAW AND POLICY

  1. David A. Schwartz, Julienne Ngoundoung Anoko, and Sharon A. Abramowitz, eds., Pregnant in the Time of Ebola: Women and Their Children in the 2013-2015 West African Epidemic (2019).

INTERNATIONAL LAW

  1. Mascha Fedorova and Willen-Jan van der Wolf, eds., The United Nations and the Protection of the Rights of Women (2005).

LEGAL EDUCATION

  1. Brandon K. West, Kimberly D. Hoffman, and Michelle Costello, eds., Creative Instructional Design: Practical Application for Librarians (2017).
  2. Sean Cordes, Instruction Design Essentials: A Practical Guide for Librarians (2018).
  3. Kevin Michael Klipfel and Dani Brecher Cook, Learner-Centered Pedagogy: Principles and Practice (2017).

LEGAL PROFESSION

  1. Deborah Calloway, Becoming a Joyful Lawyer: Contemplative Training in Non-Distraction, Empathy, and Emotional Wisdom (2012).
  2. Martin E.P. Seligman, Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness and Well-Being (2013).
  3. Brene Brown, I Thought it was Just Me (but it isn’t): Making the Journey from “What will people think?” to “I am enough.” (2008).
  4. Melody Beattie, The New Codependency: Help and Guidance for Today’s Generation (2010).
  5. Brene Brown, Rising Strong: How the Ability to Reset Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead, (2017).

TORTS

  1. Michael Neff, Premises Liability: A Guide to Success (2017).

TRIAL PRACTICE

  1. David R. Bossart, et.al., Winning Case Preparation: Understanding Jury Bias (2018).

All of these books are available from the Law Library.  If you would like to check out any of these titles, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu.  Library staff will be able to assist in locating and checking out any of these items.