Faces of the Library: Alana Rosen

Alana

We are so happy to feature one of the best student staff members ever! Alana Rosen is a 3L who is in her second year with Texas Tech School of Law Library. She is such an essential part of the library staff. You can see her wonderful exhibits throughout the year. We hope you enjoy her profile:

What are some of the tasks you do for the TTU Law Library?

Assist Professor Drake with the administration and organization of the ELR program and the Legal Practice program. Develop and create exhibits for the Collaborative Commons. Assist with all other student services programming.

 

What is your favorite thing about working at the TTU Law Library?

The staff. I love the sense of community and kindness I receive from working here.

 

What is one thing about the law library that current and prospective students should know?

If you’re feeling stressed out, the library is actually the best place to visit. You can meditate in the Wellness Room, check out sports equipment to help raise your serotonin, or color and do puzzles in the Commons to help clear your mind.

 

What is your favorite restaurant in Lubbock?

King Street Pub. It is an adorable English pub that bakes all of its own breads, pastries, and cakes.

 

What hobbies or activities do you like to do outside the law library?

I like long walks around campus to see the different sculptures and artwork, First Friday Art Trail and any kind of cultural event, and I like to cook.

 

Faces of the Library: Sherry Coffman

Staff Spotlight

This week we feature one of our favorite library staff members Sherry Coffman. She’s the first smiling face that you see in the morning. Sherry gives great advice and can help you find anything! Please check out her profile and get to know the rest of our staff:

What are some of the tasks you do for the TTU Law Library?

 Acquisitions and Circulation

What is your favorite thing about working at the TTU Law Library?

Working with a variety of people.

What is one thing about the law library that current and prospective students should know?

Besides Tylenol, Advil, and Aspirin, we provide band aids, antacids, and antibiotic ointment.

What is your favorite restaurant in Lubbock?

King Street Pub

What hobbies or activities do you like to do outside the law library?

Spending time with my grand kids and baking.

 

Faces of the Library: Briana Moody

Staff Spotlight- Briana

This week’s library staff spotlight is Briana Moody. Briana is a delight to have in the library. You can always catch her serenading students at the circulation desk! Please check out her profile:

What are some of the tasks you do for the TTU Law Library?

I have a range of duties, from checking in government documents to manning the circulation desk. One of my other favorite tasks in working in conjunction with Interlibrary Loan; receiving books from all over the country to help students get the resources they need.

What is your favorite thing about working at the TTU Law  Library?

The staff. We have one of the most supportive group of staff and faculty on the entire TTU campus! Each of us have different personalities and styles so that we can help any student that comes to the library.

What is one thing about the law library that current and  prospective students should know?

We’re here to help! Even if it’s just to chat and help you unwind. Take the time to get to know all of us at the circulation desk, we will make sure you have the resources and support you need.

What is your favorite restaurant in Lubbock?

I could go to Seoul Korean BBQ twice a week, every week for the rest of my life and die happy! Nothing is as good as their spicy bulgogi!

What hobbies or activities do you like to do outside the law  library?

I am a performer around Lubbock. I have been involved in musicals, Flatlands Dance Company, princesses/mermaid parties, and even Marilyn Monroe impersonations! Whenever I take vacations, I always try to sneak Disney into it (and it drives my husband nuts)!

 

Faces of the Library: Amanda Kitten

Amanda Spotlight

We hope you enjoy our new series: “Faces of the Library.” Throughout the year, we will spotlight one library staff member each week. Our first profile feature Amanda Kitten, our Administrative Office Assistant. Amanda started with us just over a year ago and we are so happy to have her as a part of the team! Please check out her profile and get to know our staff:

What are some of the tasks you do for the TTU Law Library?

I oversee the libraries budget, assist at the Circulation desk, and help plan and implement library events such as Trivia Night during National Library Week.

What is your favorite thing about working at the TTU Law Library?

The camaraderie because everyone is friendly and so supportive of each other and of students.

What is one thing about the law library that current and prospective students should know?

The Circulation desk has a ton of amenities that can help you out.  Pain relievers, feminine supplies, cough drops, antacids, pencils, ear plugs, and a slew of study aids amongst other things.

What is your favorite restaurant in Lubbock?

Chimy’s…my kryptonite.

What hobbies or activities do you like to do outside the law library?

I am an avid reader, video gamer, and crafter. But most of time is spent with my two dogs Loki (queen of the castle) and Jack (her court jester and shoe enthusiast.)

 

 

July 2019 Law Faculty Publications & News

Throughout the month of July, the Law Library received alerts for full-time TTU Law Faculty publications and news. Below is a compilation of those daily alerts for July 1st to July 31st, 2019.

Articles

1. Brandon E. Beck, The Orwell Court: How the Supreme Court Recast History and Minimized the Role of the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines to Justify Limiting the Impact of Johnson v. United States,66 Buff. L. Rev. 1013 (2018).

2. Bryan Camp, Recent Tax Lessons About When a Business ‘Starts’, 2019 Law360 196-45 (July 15, 2019 at 3:49 p.m.).

3. Gerry W. Beyer, Potpourri, 57-3 Real Est., Prob., & Tr. L. Rep., at 3 (2019).

4. Gerry W. Beyer, Intestacy, Wills, Estate Administration, and Trusts Update, 57-3 Real Est., Prob., & Tr. L. Rep., at 4 (2019).

Op-Eds

1. Arnold Loewy & Charles Moster, It’s debatable: Should Supreme Court justices face reconfirmation hearings every 12 years?, Lubbock Avalanche-J. (July 14, 2019 at 1:01 a.m.), https://www.lubbockonline.com/news/20190714/its-debatable-should-supreme-court-justices-face-reconfirmation-hearings-every-12-years.

Citations

1. Prof. Beyer’s article Will Contests—Prediction and Prevention is cited in the following article: Karen J. Sneddon, Voice, Strength, and No-Contest Clauses, 2019 Wis. L. Rev. 239 (2019).

2. Prof. Beyer’s work in When You Pass on, Don’t Leave the Passwords Behind: Planning for Digital Assets is cited in the following article: Shelly Kreiczer-Levy & Ronit Donyets-Kedar, Better Left Forgotten: An Argument Against Treating Some Social Media and Digital Assets as Inheritance in an Era of Platform Power, 84 Brook. L. Rev. 703 (2019).

3. Prof. Casto’s article Federal Courts’ Protective Jurisdiction over Torts Committed in Violation of the Law of Nations is cited in the following article: John Tyler Knoblett, Mind The Gap: Ensuring That Quasi-State Actors are Held Liable for Human Right Abuses, 87 Geo. Wash. L. Rev. 740 (May 2019).

4. Prof. Murphy’s article Judicial Deference, Agency Commitment, and Force of Law is cited in the following article: Brooke Ferenczy, The Failure of the Tenth Circuit to Address the Due Process Concerns Raised by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Increasing Regulations, 13 Liberty U. L. Rev. 419 (2019).

5. Prof. Sutton’s article Is There a Doctor (and a Lawyer) in the House? Why Our Good Samaritans Laws Are Doing More Harm Than Good for a National Public Health Security Strategy: A Fifty-State Survey is cited in the following article: Kristen Underhill, Money That Costs Too Much: Regulating Financial Incentives, 94 Ind. L.J. 1109 (2019).

6. Prof. Murphy’s article Judicial Deference, Agency Commitment, and Force of Law is cited in the following article: John B. Meisel, Auer Deference Should Be Dead; Long Live Seminole Rock Deference, 27 Cath. U.J.L. & Tech 73 (2019).

7. Prof. Loewy’s article The Fourth Amendment as a Device for Protecting the Innocent is cited in the following article: Denae Kassotis, The Fourth Amendment and Technological Exceptionalism After “Carpenter”: A Case Study On Harsh-Value Matching, 29 Fordham Intell. Prop. Media & Ent. L.J. 1243 (2019).

8. Prof. Shannon’s work on Texas Criminal Procedure and the Offender with Mental Illness: an Analysis and Guide 7-11 is cited in the following article: Ashley Kunz, Skinning the Cat: How Mandatory Psychiatric Evaluations for Animal Cruelty Offenders Can Prevent Future Violence, 21 Scholar: St. Mary’s L. Rev. & Soc. Just. 167 (2019).

9. Prof. Casto’s work on Brief of Amici Curiae Professors of Legal History is cited in the following article: Erin Downey, Comment: Modern-Day Pirates: Why Domestic Parent Corporations Should Be Liable Under the Alien Tort Statute For Violations of Workers’ Rights Within Global Supply Chains, 66 Am. U.L. Rev. 1933 (2019).

10. Prof. James’ article No Help for the Helpless: How the Law Has Failed to Serve and Protect Persons Suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease is cited in the following article: Elizabeth Weeks, Healthism in Tort Law, 12 J. Tort L. 81 (2019).

11. Prof. Alex Pearl’s article Originalism and Indians is cited in the following article: Daniel W. Morton-Bentley, Rhode Island’s School Funding Challenges in Historical Context, 24 Roger Williams U. L. Rev. 272, (2019).

12. Prof. Camp’s article The Misguided Drive to Measure ‘Learning Outcomes’ is cited in the following article: Hilary G. Escajeda, Legal Education: A New Growth Vision Part II—The Groundwork: Building a Customer Satisfying Innovation Ecosystem, 97 Neb. L. Rev. 935 (2019).

News

1. Professor Beyer was recently notified, by the Chair-elect of the American Bar Association Section of Real Property, Trust and Estate Law, Jo-Ann Marzullo, that he was appointed as the Probate and Property Magazine Keeping Current Probate Editor.

2. Professor Baker was invited to participate in the following 3 panels at the American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting in Washington, DC: Fostering the NextGen Library Professional: How the Changing Legal Market Shapes our Roles, Define Yourself, Just Write It: Embracing Your Inner Author. She also presented a poster called “Using the ALLStAR Official Survey to Tell Your Library’s Story.”

3. Professor Baker was an invited speaker: The Duty of Technology Competence in the Algorithmic Society, at the Chinese and American Forum on Legal Information and Law Libraries, Washington, DC, July 2019.

4. On July 19th, Professor Tracy Pearl was the featured guest on Good Law Bad Law, a law-related podcast.  The episode is entitled #144: Hands Off: A Conversation About Driverless Cars with Tracy Pearl, and is available here.   9

June 2019 Law Faculty Publications & News

Throughout the month of June, the Law Library received alerts for full-time TTU Law Faculty publications and news. Below is a compilation of those daily alerts for June 1st to June 30th, 2019.

Articles

1. Gerry W. Beyer, What Estate Planners Need to Know About Cryptocurrency, 46 Est. Plan. 24 (June 2019).

2. M. Alexander Pearl, The (Next) Big Short and The End of the Anthropocene, 2019 Utah L. Rev. 383 (2019).

3. Marin Dell, Fake News, Alternative Facts, and Disinformation: The Importance of Teaching Media Literacy to Law Students, 35 Touro L. Rev. 619 (2019).

4. Gerry W. Beyer, Recent Developments From the Texas Courts, Est. Plan. Dev. For Tex. Prof., at 1, (June 2019).

5. Bryan Camp, The Sharp Corners of ACA Premium Tax Credit Provisions, 2019 TNT 6-24.

Quotes

1. Prof. Metze is quoted in the following article: Gabriel Monte, Texas Court of Criminal Appeals agrees to review Lubbock DA’s appeal on Dixon conviction reversal, Lubbock Avalanche-J. (June 5, 2019 at 3:49 P.M.), available at https://www.lubbockonline.com/news/20190605/texas-court-of-crimal-appeals-agrees-to-review-lubbock-das-appeal-on-dixon-conviction-reversal.

Citations

1.  Prof. Murphy’s article Can They Do That? The Due Process and Article III Problems of Proposed Findings of Criminal Contempt in Bankruptcy Courts is cited in the following manual: § 2:23. Equitable Jurisdiction—Contempt Powers, 1 Bankruptcy Law Manual § 2:23 (5th ed.) (June 2019).

2. Prof. Beyer’s article Pay to the Order of Whom?-The Case of Ambiguous Multiple Payee Designation is cited in the following practice series: Daniel R. Murray & Carter H. Klein, § 5/3-110. Identification of Person to Whom Instrument is Payable, 2A Ill. Prac., UCC with Illinois Code Comments § 5/3-110 (June 2019).

3. Prof. Beyer’s article Digital Wills: Has the Time Come for Wills to Join the Digital Revolution?, is cited in the following article: Bridget J. Crawford, Wills Formalities in the Twenty-First Century, 2019 Wis. L. Rev. 269 (2019).

4. Prof. Beyer’s article Will Contests—Prediction and Prevention is cited in the following article: Karen J. Sneddon, Voice, Strength, and No-Contest Clause, 2019 Wis. L. Rev. 239 (2019).

5. Prof. Batra’s article Improving the Uniform Partition of Heirs Property Act is cited in the following article: Carla Spivack, Broken Links: A Critique of Formal Equality in Inheritance Law, 2019 Wis. L. Rev. 191 (2019).

6. Prof. Spain’s article The Opportunities and Challenges of Providing Equal Access to Justice in Rural Communities is cited in the following article: Maybell Romero, Viewing Access to Justice for Rural Mainers of Color Through a Prosecution Lens, 71 Me. L. Rev. 227 (2019).

7. Prof. Watts’ article Differences without Distinctions: Boyle’s Government Contractor Defense Fails to Recognize the Critical Differences Between Civilian and Military Plaintiffs and Between Military and Non-Military Procurement is cited in the following: Dan B. Dobbs, Paul T. Hayden, & Ellen M. Bublick, § 352.Liability and immunity of government contractors, Dobbs’ Law of Torts (June 2019).

8. Prof. Sutton’s article Asynchronous, E-Learning Education: A Comparative Study 6-12 is cited in the following article: Yvonne M. Dutton, Margaret Ryznar & Kayleigh Long, Assessing Online Learning in Law Schools: Students Say Online Classes Deliver, 96 Denv. L. Rev. 493 (2019).

9. Prof. Gonzalez’s article Employment Law Remedies for Illegal Immigrants is cited in the following article: Shaakirrah R. Sanders, Ag-Gag Free Nation, 54 Wake Forest L. Rev. 491 (2019).

10. Prof. Benham’s article Beyond Congress’s Reach: Constitutional Aspects of Inherent Power is cited in the following article: Francis J. Aul, Statutory Rules of Constitutional Interpretation and the Original Understanding of Judicial Power and Independence, 17 Geo. J.L. & Pub. Pol’y 287 (2019).

11. Prof. Alex Pearl’s article How to Be an Authentic Indian is cited in the following article: Carl Tobias, President Donald Trump’s War on Federal Judicial Diversity, 54 Wake Forest L. Rev. 531 (2019).

12. Prof. Tracy Pearl’s article Fast and Furious: The Misregulation of Driverless Cars is cited in the following article: M. Alexander Pearl, The (Next) Big Short and The End of the Anthropocene, 2019 Utah L. Rev. 383 (2019).

13. Prof. Brie Sherwin’s article Pride and Prejudice and Administrative Zombies: How Economic Woes, Outdated Environmental Regulations, and State Exceptionalism Failed Flint, Michigan is cited in the following article: Kayla Wesier-Burton, Clean Drinking Water: A Stream of Success and Opportunity For Reform, 2019 Utah L. Rev. 503 (2019).

14. Prof. Murphy’s article Judicial Deference, Agency Commitment, and Force of Law is cited in the following article: John B. Meisel, Auer Deference Should Be Dead; Long Live Seminole Rock Deference, 27 Cath. U.J. L. & Tech. 73 (2019).

15. Prof. Beyer’s work on Texas Law of Wills is cited in the following article: J. Ellen Bennett, Mark R. Caldwell, Donovan Campbell, Jr., You Settled It, Right? Family Settlement Agreement in Probate, Trust, and Guardianship Disputes, 11 Est. Plan. & Community Prop. L.J. 213 (2019).

16. Prof. Shannon’s article The Revised NCAA Division I Governance Structure After Three Years: A Scorecard in the following article: Grant Newton, The NCAA on Notice: How Utilizing Principles of Federalism Could Relieve Antitrust Pressure, 21 Vand. J. Ent. & Tech. L. 1091 (2019).

17. Prof. Benham’s article Proportionality, Pretrial Confidentiality, and Discovery Sharing is cited in the following article: Jeffrey W. Sheehan, Confidences Worth Keeping: Rebalancing Legitimate Interests in Litigant’s Private Information in an Era of Open-Access Courts, 21 Vand. J. Ent. & Tech. L. 905 (2019).

18. Prof. Outenreath’s article Cheers! Ending Quill… What can be Learned from the Wine Industry is cited in the following article: Frederick N. Hanna, Annual Survey of South Carolina Law: Administrative & Regulatory Law: Don’t Feel Like Going to the Store? I’ll Drink to That! How to Govern the Direct Shipment of Alcohol in South Carolina, 70 S.C. L. Rev. 1087 (2019).

19. Prof. Beyer’s article Ante-Mortem Probate: A Viable Alternative is cited in the following article: Charles E. Cantú, An Oral History of St. Mary’s University School of Law (1961-2018), 50 St. Mary’s L.J. 209 (2019).

20. Prof. Beyer’s article Statutory Fill-in-Will Forms: The First Decade—Theoretical Constructs and Empirical Findings is cited in the following article: Andrew L. Lawson, Body Building: Expanding Arkansas’s Standards for Holographic Wills, 71 Ark. L. Rev. 917 (2019).

21. Prof. Beyer’s article When You Pass On: Don’t Leave the Passwords Behind: Planning for Digital Assets is cited in the following article: Nora Hood, Domestic Asset Protection Trusts: A Debtor’s Friend and Creditor’s Foe, 13 Brook. J. Corp. Fin. & Com. L. 443 (2019).

News

1. On June 7, Professor Beyer was honored to be one of the invited speakers at the 46th Annual Midwest Estate, Tax, and Business Planning Institute held in Indianapolis, Indiana. His presentation focused on the cutting edge issues addressing cyber estate planning and administration including discussions of the Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act and planning for clients who own cryptocurrency.

2. Professor Beyer has been asked to serve on the Decedent’s Estates Committee of Real Estate, Probate, and Trust Law Section of the State Bar of Texas. Prof. Beyer will work with other committee members to draft legislation for introduction into the 2021 Texas Legislature.

3. Professor Beyer will participate in the ACTEC/ALI-CLE Webinar on Electronic Wills.

4. On June 18, Professor Beyer was the lead off speaker at a three-day program, the 43rd Annual Advanced Estate Planning & Probate Course, sponsored by the State Bar of Texas. His presentation and accompanying paper were entitled Case Law Update and gave attendees insights into recent judicial developments relating to the Texas law of intestacy, wills, estate administration, trusts, and other estate planning matters.

5. On June 18, Professor Tracy Pearl presented her paper: Hands Off the Wheel: The Role of Law in the Coming Extinction of Human-Driven Vehicles, at the 30th Annual European Conference of the International Telecommunications Society in Helsinki, Finland.

6. Professor Tracy Pearl appeared on two episodes of the Human-Robot Interaction podcast. Episode 1: Autonomous Vehicles—The Future of Transportation, and Episode 2: Autonomous Vehicles—Legal Concerns. Listen to Episode 1 here: https://www.human-robot-interaction.org/2019/03/07/autonomous-vehicles-the-future-of-transportation/. Listen to Episode 2 here: https://www.human-robot-interaction.org/2019/03/12/autonomous-vehicles-legal-concerns/.

7. Professor Beck argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in United States v. Davis on April 17, 2019. You can listen to the oral argument here, or read a written transcript here. On June 24th, the Court concurred with Professor Beck’s argument that 18 U.S.C. § 924(c)(3)(B) was unconstitutionally vague and invalidated the statute. Justice Gorsuch penned the majority opinion, available here: https://casetext.com/case/united-states-v-davis-2053.

8. Professor Drake’s recent talk on cognitive science and legal research was highlighted in the latest RIPS-SIS blog. You can read it here.

June 2019 New Books

2019 June new books

In June 2019, the Law Library added the following new titles to the collection to support the research and curricular needs of our faculty and students.

COMPARATIVE AND FOREIGN LAW

  1. Sergei Antonov, Bankrupts and Usurers of Imperial Russia: Debt, Property, and the Law in the Age of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy (2016).

CONTRACTS

  1. Margaret Jane Radin, Boilerplate: The Fine Print, Vanishing Rights, and the Rule of Law (2013).
  2. Lisa R. Lifshitz and John A. Rothchild, ed., Cloud 3.0: Drafting and Negotiating Cloud Computing Agreements (2019).

CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE

  1. Yale H. Caplan and Bruce A. Goldberger, eds., Garriott’s Medicolegal Aspects of Alcohol (2015).

EVIDENCE

  1. Cecil C. Kuhne III, A Litigator’s Guide to Expert Witnesses (2019).

LEGAL EDUCATION

  1. Jennifer E. Nutefall, ed., Service Learning, Information Literacy, and Libraries (2016).
  2. James M. Lang, Small Teaching: Everyday Lessons from the Science of Learning (2016).
  3. Saundra Yancy McGuire and Stephanie McGuire, Teach Students How to Learn: Strategies You Can Incorporate Into Any Course to Improve Student Metacognition, Study Skills, and Motivation (2015).
  4. Linda B. Nilson, Teaching at its Best: A Research-Based Resource for College Instructors (2016).

LEGAL HISTORY

  1. Marilynne K. Roach, Six Women of Salem: The Untold Story of the Accused and Their Accusers in the Salem Witch Trials (2013).

TECHNOLOGY LAW

  1. Primavera De Filippi and Aaron Wright, Blockchain and the Law: The Rule of Code (2018).
  2. Mark Chinen, Law and Autonomous Machines: The Co-Evolution of Legal Responsibility and Technology (2019).
  3. Michael A. Livermore and Daniel N. Rockmore, eds., Law as Data: Computation, Text, & the Future of Legal Analysis (2019).

All of these books are available from the Law Library.  If you would like to check out any of these titles, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu.  Library staff will be able to assist in locating and checking out any of these items.