March 2021 New Books

In March 2021, the Law Library added the following new titles to the collection to support the research and curricular needs of our faculty and students.

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

1. Erik Nielson and Andrea L. Dennis, Rap on Trial:  Race, Lyrics, and Guilt in America (2019).

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW, GENERALLY

2. Kimberly K. Smith, The Conservation Constitution:  The Conservation Movement and Constitutional Change, 1870-1930 (2019).

CONTRACTS

3. Ben L. Fernandez, Drafting & Revising Contracts:  An Introduction to Drafting in Plain English and Revising Complex Form Documents (2019).

EMPLOYMENT PRACTICE

4. Paul Douglas Foote, James R. Harrington, and John McCaskill Jr., The Perils of Posting:  Court Cases on Off-Duty Social Media Conduct of Public Employees (2020).

FIRST AMENDMENT

5. Nathan C. Walker, First Amendment and State Bans on Teachers’ Religious Garb:  Analyzing the Historic Origins of Contemporary Legal Challenges in the United States (2020).

HEALTH LAW AND POLICY

6. Mary Ziegler, Abortion and the Law in America:  Roe v. Wade to the Present (2020).

IMMIGRATION LAW

7. J.C. Salyer, Court of Injustice:  Law Without Recognition in U.S. Immigration (2020).

JUDGES

8. John C. Domino, Texas Supreme Court Justice Bob Gammage:  A Jurisprudence of Rights and Liberties (2020).

LEGAL ANALYSIS AND WRITING

9. Cassandra L. Hill, D’Andra Millsap Shu, and Katherine T. Vukadin, The Legal Memo:  50 Exercises for Mastery:  Practice for the New Legal Writer (2021).

10. Melissa Shultz and Christine Tamer, Writing by Numbers:  Legal Writing Made Easy (2020).

11. Kevin Bennardo, Thinking and Writing About Law (2021).

LEGAL HISTORY

12. Sara Mayeux, Free Justice:  A History of the Public Defender in Twentieth-Century America (2020).

OIL, GAS, AND MINERAL LAW

13. Oil, Gas, and Energy Resources Law Section of the State Bar of Texas, Landmarks of a Century in Oil and Gas Law:  Twenty Cases that Shaped Texas Oil and Gas Jurisprudence (2017).

PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE

14. Lucy Endel Bassli, The Simple Guide to Legal Innovation:  Basics Every Lawyer Should Know (2020).

15. Jean L. Batman, Of Counsel:  Forms and Advice for Legal Practitioners (2019).

16. Conrad Saam, Own the Map:  Marketing Your Law Firm’s Address Online (2020).

17. Aaron Street, et.al., The Small Firm Roadmap:  A Survival Guide to the Future of Your Law Practice (2019).

PRESIDENT/EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT

18. Saikrishna Bangalore Prakash, The Living Presidency:  An Originalist Argument Against Its Ever-Expanding Powers (2020).

RACE AND ETHNICITY

19. Lawrence Goldstone, On Account of Race:  The Supreme Court, White Supremacy, and the Ravaging of African American Voting Rights (2020).

20. Natsu Taylor Saito, Settler Colonialism, Race, and the Law:  Why Structural Racism Persists (2020).

SPACE LAW

21. Neta Palkovitz, Regulating a Revolution:  Small Satellites and the Law of Outer Space (2020).

TORTS

22. Robert Bilott, Exposure:  Poisoned Water, Corporate Greed, and One Lawyer’s Twenty-Year Battle Against Dupont (2019).

WATER LAW

23. Makane Moise Mbengue and Rukmini Das, Use of Experts in International Freshwater Disputes:  A Critical Assessment (2019).

24. Farhana Sultana and Alex Loftus, eds., Water Politics:  Governance, Justice, and the Right to Water (2020).

25. Catherine Banet, ed., The Law of the Seabed:  Access, Uses, and Protection of Seabed Resources (2020).

26. Salman M. A. Salman, Notification Concerning Planned Measures on Shared Watercourses:  Synergies Between the Watercourses Convention and the World Bank Policies and Practice (2019).

All of these books are available from the Law Library.  If you would like to check out any of these titles, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu.  Library staff will be able to assist in locating and checking out any of these items.

Scholarly Research and Writing: getting started is the hardest part

Guest Author: Gabrielle Bechyne

Photo by Vlada Karpovich on Pexels.com

Scholarly legal research is not an easy task. Whether you are writing for a law school journal, an advanced writing course, a CLE, or a legal magazine, the process is likely going to be largely the same.. All writing endeavors begin at the same place: research. Especially in today’s digital age, information (and misinformation) is so easy come by, and it comes and goes more quickly than ever. On top of the speed at which information comes and goes, it is even harder to hold a potential reader’s attention for longer than the length of a TikTok video.

Well, the process doesn’t have to be so daunting. And whether or not your work gets read, gets published, or gets an “A” does not mean that the legal research process has been a waste of your time. As up-and-coming legal scholars, all of our most valuable skills come together and are strengthened throughout the legal research process. Below you will find some resources and tips for getting started and staying organized throughout your writing project.

Choose a topic that interests you. If you are going to spend the amount of time and energy that scholarly legal research requires, try to choose a topic that you get excited about. This is the step where spending extra time can go a long way—you will thank yourself later if every time you sit down to research or write you don’t fall asleep or feel like throwing your laptop out of the window. This is also the step where you get to be as creative as you want to be when it comes to research. Some good places to get topic ideas include blogs, news outlets, or tracking current legislation.

Secondary Sources—use them! Secondary sources are the quickest way to find relevant cases, statutes, and regulations on point. Examples of secondary sources include: scholarly articles, treatises, and legal encyclopedias. If you are writing a student comment or a paper for a writing course, do a quick search for other articles written on something close to your topic. I like to think of secondary sources as letting someone else do the background research for me. When you research secondary sources, you are checking a lot of boxes off of your scholarly research to-do list:

  • Preemption check
  • Background research on your topic
  • Quickly locating primary authority on your topic

Wow! Did you know you were being so productive, just by locating some articles and skimming O’Connor’s? However, don’t stop there. It’s important to stay organized while you do this!

Staying organized. Lastly, the importance of organizing your research can’t be stressed enough. Just as it is important to do good legal research, it is important to keep track of your research so that you do not unnecessarily repeat work. Utilizing folders on Westlaw and Lexis is a good way to stay organized. If you like hard copies, print out your research and create a research binder. For more information, visit our scholarly research guide https://libguides.law.ttu.edu/scholarlyresearch

If you get stuck, feel free to reach out to your friendly neighborhood law librarians!

Email:  reference.law@ttu.edu
Phone:  806-742-7155
Chat: Use the “Ask a Librarian” chat feature on the Law Library’s Homepage.

2021 February New Resources

In February 2021, the Law Library added the following new resources to the collection to support the research and curricular needs of our faculty and students.

New Resources

VerdictSearch– Provides verdict and settlement research. Each report includes a full narrative of the facts, allegations, injuries, damages and result. Other key data points include, when available and relevant, expert witnesses, attorneys and law firms, insurers and coverage limits, settlement offers and demands, and docket information, such as the caption, index number, court and judge.

New Books

BANKING AND FINANCE

1. Pierre-Hugues Verdier, Global Banks on Trial:  U.S. Prosecutions and the Remaking of International Finance (2020).

2. Philipp Hacker, et.al. eds., Regulating Blockchain:  Techno-Social and Legal Challenges (2019).

COURTS

3. Richard Susskind, Online Courts and the Future of Justice (2019).

CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE

4. Seth W. Stoughton, Jeffrey J. Noble, and Geoffrey P. Alpert, Evaluating Police Uses of Force (2021).

GAMING

5. Robert M. Jarvis, J. Wesley Cochran, and Ronald J. Rychlak, Gaming Law and Gambling Law:  Cases, Materials, and Problems (2021).

IMMIGRATION LAW

6. Julia Rose Kraut, Threat of Dissent:  A History of Ideological Exclusion and Deportation in the United States (2020).

INFORMATION PRIVACY

7. Mark Burdon, Digital Data Collection and Information Privacy Law (2020).

JUDGES

8. Charles Gardner Geyh, James J. Alfini, and James Sample, Judicial Conduct and Ethics (2020).

9. Renee Knake Jefferson and Hannah Brenner Johnson, Shortlisted:  Women in the Shadows of the Supreme Court (2020).

10. Herbert M. Kritzer, Judicial Selection in the States:  Politics and the Struggle for Reform (2020).

LEGAL ANALYSIS AND WRITING

11. Mary Beth Beazley and Monte Smith, Briefs and Beyond:  Persuasive Legal Writing (2021).

LEGAL EDUCATION

12. Primary Research Group, Inc., Survey of Law Libraries:  Best Practices in Docket Searching (2019).

POLITICS

13. Mark Tushnet, Taking Back the Constitution:  Activist Judges and the Next Age of American Law (2020).

PRESIDENT/EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT

14. Laura Notton, ed., Federal Regulatory Guide (2020).

All resources are available from the Law Library.  If you would like to check out any of these titles, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu

All electronic databases are available through the Library’s webpage, http://www.depts.ttu.edu/law/lawlibrary/index.php.   

Library staff will be able to assist in locating and checking out any of these items or helping you contact the Librarian on call for questions about electronic resources.

January 2021 Law Faculty Publications & News

Throughout the month of January, the Law Library received alerts for full-time TTU Law Faculty publications and news. Below is a compilation of those daily alerts for January 1st to January 31st, 2021.

Articles, Essays, & Books

1. Gerry W. Beyer, Estate Planning & Probate Law, Tex. B.J., Jan. 2021, at 33.

2. Gerry W. Beyer, Marital Property and Homesteads (2020-2021 Supplements to Volumes & 39 of the Texas Practice Series).

3. Brian D. Shannon, Texas Mental Health Legislative Reform: Significant Achievements With More To Come, 53 Tex. Tech L. Rev. 99 (2020).

4. Arnold H. Loewy, The Strange Case of Timothy Hennis: How Should It Be Resolved, 53 Tex. Tech L. Rev. 1 (2020).

5. Gerry W. Beyer, A Safe Harbor in the Medicaid Adventure: Lady Bird and Transfer on Death Deeds, 46 ACTEC L.J. 3 (2020).

6. Gerry W. Beyer, Cyber Estate Planning and Administration, Est. Plan., Jan. 2021, at 28.

7. Gerry W. Beyer, ed., Keeping Current—Probate, Prob. & Prop., Jan./Feb. 2021, at 30.

8. Jamie J. Baker, The Intersectionality of Law Librarianship & Gender, 65 Vill. L. Rev. 1011 (2020).

9. Gerry W. Beyer, 2020 Year In Review: Estate Planning and Probate Law, 83 Tex. B. J. 33 (2021).

Op-Eds

1. Prof Loewy, It’s Debatable: Should Lame Duck Period Be Reduced to Smooth Transitions?, Lubbock Avalanche-Journal (January 10, 2021; 3:53a) https://www.lubbockonline.com/story/opinion/columns/2021/01/10/its-debatable-should-lame-duck-period-reduced-smooth-transitions/6603931002/

2. Prof. Loewy, It’s Debatable: Should Sen. Cruz Be Expelled From Senate for Reemarks? Lubbock Avalanvhe-Journal (January 24, 2021; 4:59a) https://www.lubbockonline.com/story/opinion/2021/01/24/its-debatable-should-senator-ted-cruz-expelled-senate/4231895001/

Citations

1. Prof. Beyer’s book Real Estate Transactions 3d, is cited in the following article: Lawrence A. Frolik, Appropriate Housing for Older Clients, 46 ACTEC L.J. 53 (2020).

2. Prof. Beyer’s article Electronic Wills- What Estate Planners Need To Know is cited in the following article: Naman Anand & Dikshi Arora, Where There is a Will, There Is No Way: Covid 19 and A Case For The Recognition of E-Wills in India and Other Common Law Jurisdictions, 27 ILSA J. Int’l & Comp. L. 77 (2021).

3. Prof. Casto’s article The Origins of Federal Admiralty Juridsiction in an Age of Privateers, Smugglers, and Pirates is cited in the following article: Thomas J. Snyder, My Car Is My Castle: The Failed Historical Roots of the Vehicle Exception to the Fourth Amendment, 93 S. Cal. L. Rev. 987 (2020).

4. Prof. Casto’s article The Supreme Court in the Early Republic is cited in the following article: Jackson Bowker, The Issue of Condemning State Owned Property Pursuant to the Natural Gas Act: In Re Penneast, 41 Energy L.J. 403 (2020).

5. Prof. Gonzalez’ article At The Intersection of Religious Organization Missions and Employment Laws: The Case of Minister Employment Suits is cited in the following article: Jeremy Weese, The (Un)Holy Shield: Rethinking the Ministerial Exception, 67 UCLA L. Rev. 1320 (2020).

6. Prof. Murphy’s book Administrative Law and Practice is cited in the following article: Joshua Knobe & Scott Shapiro, Proximate Cause Explained: An Essay In Experimental Jurisprudence, 88 U. Chi. L. Rev. 165 (2021).

7. Prof. Benham’s article Tangled Incentives: Proportionality and the Market for Reputational Harm is cited in the following article: Garth A. Molander, Do Elder Law Practitioners and the American Legal Profession Need an Ethical Confidentiality Rule or Can Both Do Without an ABA Model Rule 1.6?, 2020-201602 National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys Journal (2021).

8. Prof. Chiappinelli’s article The Underappreciated Importance of Personal Jurisdiction in Delaware’s Success is cited in the following article: Joel E. Friedlander, Performing Equity: Why Court of Chancery Transcript Rulings Are Law, U of Penn, Inst for Law & Econ Research Paper No. 20-58 (2021).

9. Prof. Murphy’s article Separation of Powers and the Horizontal Force of Precedent is cited in the following article: Cody Ray Milner, Into The Multiverse: Replacing The Intelligible Principle Standard With A Modern Multi-Theory of Nondelegation, 28 Geo. Mason L. Rev. 395 (2020).

10.  Prof. Chiappinelli’s article The Myth of Director Consent: After Shaffer, Beyond Nicastro is cited in the following article: Megan Wischmeier Shaner, Privately Ordered Fiduciaries, 28 Geo. Mason L. Rev. 354 (2020).

11. Prof. Chiappinelli’s article The Underappreciated Importance of Personal Jurisdiction in Delaware’s Success is cited in the following article: Megan Wischmeier Shaner, Privately Ordered Fiduciaries, 28 Geo. Mason L. Rev. 354 (2020).

12. Prof Murphy’s article Evidence? We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Evidence!: How Ambiguity in Some States’ Anti-SLAPP Laws Threatens to De-Fang a Popular and Powerful Weapon Against Frivolous Litigation is cited in the following article: Chase Holt & Daniel Simons, Rico As A Case Study In Weaponizing Defamation and the International Response to Corporate Censorship, 9 J. Int’l Media & Ent. L. 1 (2020-2021).

13. Prof. Gossett’s article “[Take Us from Our] Wretched Refuse”: The Deportation of America’s Adoptees, is cited in the following article: Lisa A. Tucker, From Contract Rights To Contact Rights: Rethinking The Paradigm for Post-Adoption Contact Agreements, 100 B.U. L. Rev. 2317 (2020).

14. Prof. Christopher’s article Putting Legal Writing on the Tenure Track: One School’s Experience is cited in the following article: Jamie J. Baker, The Intersectionality of Law Librarianship & Gender, 65 Vill. L. Rev. 1011 (2020).

15. Prof. Baker’s article A Legal Research Odyssey: Artificial Intelligence as a Disruptor is cited in the following article: Nicholas Mignanelli, Citing Legal Research: Who Needs It?, 112 Law Library Journal 327 (2020).

16. A multitude of Prof. Beyer’s works, including Slayer Statutes from State to State and Texas Wills and Estates: Cases and Materials are cited in the following article: Macie Alcoser, Spousal Abuse Disqualification Statute: It’s Time To Protect Other Victims, 13 Est. Plan. & Community Prop. L.J. 269 (2020).

17. A multitude of Prof. Beyer’s works including Estate Planning Highlights of the 2017 Legislature and An Estate Planner’s Guide to the Uniform Partition of Heirs Property Act are cited in the following article: R. Shaun Rainey, Uniform Partition of Heirs’ Property Act: Partition With an Acetate Overlay, 13 Est. Plan. & Community Prop. L.J. 233 (2020).

18. A multitude of Prof. Beyer’s works including Estate Plans: The Durable Power of Attorney for Property Management and Texas Law of Wills is cited in the following article: Lauren Davis Hunt, Christopher T. Hodge, & Brian T. Thompson, Alternatives to Tortious Interference with Inheritance, 13 Est. Plan. & Community Prop. L.J. 59 (2020).

Quotes

1. Prof. Metze is quoted in the following article: Caitlin Randle, Lawyers Discuss Charges Against Jenny Cudd and Eliel Rosa in Capitol Mob, Midland Reporter-Telegram (January 15, 2021; 6:36p)

News

1. Prof. Sutton is mentioned in the article President Schovanec Discusses COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout in The Daily Toreador, discussing the formation of a committee to organize the process of vaccine distribution at Texas Tech.

2. Associate Dean Humphrey was elected as the Chair-Elect of the Associate Deans for Academic Affairs & Research section of AALS.

3. On January 20, 2021, Prof. Brian Shannon was reappointed to a second term on the Texas Judicial Commission on Mental Health.

December 2020 Law Faculty Publications & News

Throughout the month of December, the Law Library received alerts for full-time TTU Law Faculty publications and news. Below is a compilation of those daily alerts for December 1 to December 31, 2020.

Articles, Essays, and Reviews

1. Gerry W. Beyer, An Estate Planner’s Guide to Specific Testamentary Gifts, Est. Plan. Dev. Tex. Prof., Nov. 2020, at 1.

2. Richard Murphy, §§ 8337 & 8393 of Federal Practice & Procedure (Wright & Miller) (December 2020 Update).

Op-Eds

1. Prof. Loewy, It’s Debatable: Are City Officials Liable for Rising Virus Cases, Deaths?, Lubbock Avalanche-Journal (December 1, 2020; 2:42a) https://www.lubbockonline.com/story/opinion/2020/11/29/its-debatable-lubbock-officials-liable-coronavirus-cases-deaths/6425930002/

2. Prof. Loewy, It’s Debatable: Should Care Be Deferred For People Who Get The Virus On Purpose?, Lubbock Avalanche-Journal (December 13, 2020; 5:05a) https://www.lubbockonline.com/story/opinion/2020/12/13/its-debatable-defer-care-those-who-get-coronavirus-purpose/3879670001/

3. Prof. Loewy, It’s Debatable: Should High Court Have Heard Texas Election Suit?, Lubbock Avalanche-Journal (December 27, 2020; 5:47a) https://www.lubbockonline.com/story/opinion/2020/12/27/its-debatable-supreme-court-hearing-lawsuit-texas-election/3997680001/

Citations

1. Prof. Murphy’s article Punitive Damages, Explanatory Verdicts, and the Hard Look is cited in the following book: Lawrence G. Cetrulo, Toxic Torts Litigation Guide (December 2020 Update).

2. Prof. Spain’s article Collaborative Law: A Critical Reflection on Whether a Collaborative Orientation Can Be Ethically Incorporated into the Practice of Law, is cited in the following book: Ann M. Haralambie, Handling Child Custody, Abuse and Adoption Cases 3d (December 2020 Update).

3. Prof. Murphy’s article Can They Do That? The Due Process and Article III Problems of Proposed Findings of Criminal Contempt in Bankruptcy Court is cited in the following manual: Hon. Joan N. Feeney, Hon. Michael G. Williamson, and Michael J. Stepan, Esq., Bankruptcy Law Manual (December 2020 Update).

4. Prof. Beyer’s article Pet Animals: What Happens When Their Humans Die? is cited in the following book: Mary F. Radford, Georgia Trusts and Trustees (December 2020 Update).

5. Prof. Beyer’s article Annual Survey of Texas Law: Wills & Trusts is cited in the following book: Mary F. Radford, Georgia Trusts and Trustees (December 2020 Update).

6. Prof. Beyer’s article Estate Planning in the Digital Age is cited in the following book: Mary F. Radford, Georgia Trusts and Trustees (December 2020 Update).

7. Prof. Murphy’s article The DIY Unitary Executive is cited in the following article: Kathryn E. Kovacs, The Supersecretary in Chief, 94 S. Cal. L. Rev. Postscript 61 (2020).

8. Prof. Chiappinelli’s article Jurisdiction over Directors and Officers in Delaware is cited in the following article: Jessie M. Fried & Ehud Kamar, China, and the Rise of Law-Proof Insiders, European Corporate Governance Institute – Law Working Paper 557/2020 (2020).

9. Prof. Casto’s article Foreign Affairs and the Constitution in the Age of Fighting Sail is cited in the following article: Michael D. Ramsey, Courts and Foreign Affairs: “Their Historic Role”: Restoring the Global Judiciary: Why the Supreme Court Should Rule in U.S. Foreign Affairs, 35 Const. Comment. 173 (2020).

10. Prof. Benham’s article Tangled Incentives: Proportionality and the Market for Reputation Harm is cited in the following article: Garth A. Molander, Do Elder Law Practitioners And The American Legal Profession Need An Ethical Confidentiality Rule Or Can Both Do Without Aba Model Rule 1.6?, 16 NAELA J. 59 (2020).

11. Prof. Nowlin’s article The Warren Court’s House Built on Sand: From Security in Persons, Houses, Papers, and Effects to Mere Reasonableness in Fourth Amendment Doctrine is cited in the following article: Andrew Guthrie Ferguson, Structural Sensor Surveillance , 106 Iowa L. Rev. 47 (2020).

12. Prof. Huffman’s & Prof. Rosen’s book Military Law: Criminal Justice and Administrative Process is cited in the following article: Eugene R. Fidell, Covid-19 and Military Law, 11 J. Nat’l Security L. & Pol’y 181 (2020).

13. Prof. Camp’s blog post Lesson from the Tax Court: The Turbo-Tax Defense is cited in the following article: Kenneth C. Weil, Recourse and Nonrecourse Debt: What Are the Federal Income Consequences When the Character of Debt Changes, 74 Tax Law. 141 (2020).

14. Prof. James’ article The African-American Church, Political Activity, and Tax Exemption is cited in the following article: Benjamin M. Leff, Fixing the Johnson Amendment Without Totally Destroying It, 6 U. Pa. J. L. & Pub. Aff. 115 (2020).

15. Prof. Benham’s article Dirty Secrets: The First Amendment in Protective-Order Litigation, is cited in the following article: Clay Calvert, Escaping Doctrinal Lockboxes in First Amendment Jurisprudence: Workarounds for Strict Scrutiny for Low-Value Speech in the Face of Stevens and Reed, 73 SMU L. Rev. 727 (2020).

16. Prof. Rosen’s article Katcoff V. Marsh At Twenty-Two: The Military Chaplaincy And The Separation Of Church And State is cited in §§ 36:3, 36:10, 36:13, & 36:14 of Religious Organizations and the Law (December 2020 Update).

17. Prof. James’ article The African-American Church, Political Activity, and Tax Exemption is cited in §32:14 of Religious Organizations and the Law (December 2020 Update).

18. Prof. Metze’s article Dissecting the ABA Texas Capital Punishment Assessment Report of 2013: Death and Texas, a Surprising Improvement is cited in the following article: Valena E. Beety, Forensic Evidence in Arizona: Reforms for Victims and Defendants, 52 Ariz. St. L.J. 709 (2020).

19. Prof. Beyer’s article with Claire G. Hargrove, Digital Wills: Has the Time Come for Wills to Join the Digital Revolution? is cited in the following article: Peter Wendel, Testamentary Transfers and the Intent Versus Formalities Debate: The Cose for a ‘Charitable’ Common Ground, 69 U. Kan. L. Rev. 249 (2020).

20. Prof. Chiappinelli’s article The Myth of Director Consent: After Shaffer, Beyond Nicastro is cited in §116:21 of Business and Commercial Litigation in Federal Courts 4th Edition (December 2020 Update).

21. Prof. Chiappinelli’s article ­­­­The Myth of Director Consent: After Shaffer, Beyond Nicastro is cited in §3:7 of Treatise on the Law of Corporations 3d (December 2020 Update).

22. Prof. Shannon’s article The 1995 Revisions to the DTPA: Altering the Landscape is cited in §6:19 of McDonald &Carlson Texas Civil Practice (December 2020 Update).

Quotes

1. Prof. Shannon is quoted in the following article: Trinady Joslin, Disabled Texans Worry Loss of Affordable Care Act Could Cost Them Programs That Help Them Live Independently, Texas Tribune, (December 30, 2020; 5:00am), available at https://www.texastribune.org/2020/12/30/disability-texas-affordable-care-act/