Tips for Virtual Group Studying & Instructions for Law Library’s Virtual Study Room Reservations

Tips for Successful Virtual Group Studying: 

  1. Keep the group size small and manageable.
    • 3-5 members is a good size for a virtual study group.
  2. Keep Study Group Goals Realistic.
    • Set a realistic goal for efficient studying time. 2 or 3 hours with breaks will likely be productive, but 5 or 6 hours may be too ambitious.
    • Build in time at the beginning to catch up and chat with your friends.
    • Build in study breaks to refresh and re-group, and to give your eyes a break from looking at a screen.
    • Give yourselves grace. This is a unprecedented time for everyone. If your online study group session does not go as planned or perfectly, that’s okay.
  3. Keep Study Time Focused.
    • Pick a group leader to keep the group on track.
    • Select a quiet space in your home with minimal distractions.
    • Try to start on time and end on time.
  4. Stick to a plan.
    • Discuss with group members how the study group time will be used most effectively, depending on the studying styles of the group members.
    • Try to meet the needs of all group members—this is where it is beneficial to keep the size of the group small.
    • Create a schedule/syllabus of tasks:
      • I.e. Spend an hour on practice questions, 20 min talking out/explaining big concepts, 45 min on a practice essay.
  5. Be prepared.
    • Study ahead of time so group time can be used efficiently.
    • Identify concepts that you struggle with.
    • Make a list of questions to ask group members.
  6. Take Action.
    • If there are areas multiple group members are struggling with, email the professor with questions. Send a single email from one group member and share the response with everyone in the group.
    • Several professors have indicated that they are willing to virtually conference with study groups. If your group has some subject areas that they think would be best explained coming from the professor, set up a virtual conference with a professor.
    • Come to the conference prepared. Have specific questions ready. It may be helpful to assign questions to specific group members so everyone participates, keeping the meeting productive and beneficial for everyone.
  7. Reflect.
    • Be honest with yourselves— how productive was the study group?  Be open to discussing with your group members what did and did not work.
    • Adjust based on your reflections.  This will ensure that the study group is working for everyone.computer-man

How to Reserve Virtual Study Rooms

The Law Library has created ten virtual study rooms where students can meet with their study groups.

Students can register to use one of our online study rooms using our Room Reservation system.

Law Students may reserve two 2-hour blocks per day for a total of 4-hours maximum for study rooms per day.

The same study group should not book the same room for more than 4 hours per day.  Students must reserve the room using the link above BEFORE entering a room.

Study Room Reservation Guidelines:

  • Rooms are only available to Law Students, Law Faculty and Law Staff.
  • Rooms are available for booking 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • Each study room booking defaults to a maximum 2-hour reservation.
  • Law Students may reserve two 2-hour blocks per day for a total of 4-hours maximum for study rooms per day.
  • The 2-hour reservations may be consecutive, or may be split.
  • The same study group should not book the same room for more than 4 hours per day.
  • Study room reservations can be made up to 2 weeks in advance.
  • During Law Library finals hours, study room reservations can be made 2 days in advance.
  • You are expected to use the room while you have it reserved, please do not leave the room empty for an extended period of time.
  • If you are finished with a study room before your reservation has expired, please contact the Circulation Desk at 806-742-3957 or email to circulation.law@ttu.edu.

For more resources on how to cope with the challenges of remote learning, please see the Law Library’s Remote Access to Library Services LibGuide, where you can get more tips on working from home, ideas for how to de-stress, and much more.

March 2020 Law Faculty Publications & News

Throughout the month of March, the Law Library received alerts for full-time TTU Law Faculty publications and news. Below is a compilation of those daily alerts for March 1st to March 31st, 2020.

Articles

1. Gerry W. Beyer, ed., Keeping Current— Probate, Prob. & Prop. At 30 (2020).

Quote

1. Professor Camp was quoted in the following article: Joshua Rosenberg, Dems’ Attempt to Get Trump’s Tax Returns Likely to Time Out, Law360 Tax Authority (March 4, 2020), available at: https://www.law360.com/tax-authority/articles/1250092/dems-attempt-to-get-trump-s-tax-returns-likely-to-time-out.

Citations

1. Prof. Murphy’s work in Eight Things American Can’t Figure Out About Controlling Administrative Power is cited in the following article: Jeffrey M. Surprenant, Pulling the Reins On Chevron, 65 Loy. L. Rev. 399 (2019).

2. Prof. Chiappinelli’s book Cases and Materials on Business Entities is cited in the following article: Michael Held and Thomas M. Noone, Bank Culture and the Official Sector: A Spectrum of Options, 43 Seattle U. L. Rev. 683 (2020).

3. Prof. Ross’s article Protecting the Unsophisticated Tenant: A Call for Cap on Late Fees in the Housing Choice Voucher Program is cited in the Ericka Petersen, Building A House for Gideon: The Right to Counsel in Evictions, 16 Stan. J. Civ. Rts. & Civ. Liberties 63 (2020).

4. Prof. Loewy’s article Religious Neutrality and the Death Penalty is cited in the following article: April J. Anderson, Peremptory Challenges at the Turn of the Nineteenth Century: Development of Modern Jury Selection Strategies as Seen in Practitioners’ Trial Manuals, 16 Stan. J. Civ. Rts. & Civ. Liberties 1 (2020).

5. Prof. Casto’s book The Supreme Court in the Early Republic: The Chief Justiceships of John Jay and Oliver Ellsworth is cited in the following article: D.A. Jeremy Telman, All That is Liquidated Melts Into Air: Five Meta-Interpretive Issues, 24 Barry L. Rev. 1 (2019).

6. Prof. Metze’s article Dissecting the ABA Texas Capital Punishment Assessment Report of 2013: Death and Texas, A Surprising Improvement is cited in the following article: Valena E. Beety, Changed Science Writs and State Habeas Relief, 57 Hous. L. Rev. 483 (2020).

7. Prof. Robert Sherwin’s work in The Changing Landscape of the Texas Citizens Participation Act is cited in the following article: Joseph F. Cleveland Jr., J. Heath Coffman, & Kevin C. Smith, TUTSA and the Texas Citizens Participation Act, 20202A Advanced Intell. Prop. L. 3-11 (2020).

8. Prof. Loewy’s article Culpability, Dangerousness, and Harm: Balancing the Factors on Which Our Criminal Law is Predicated is cited in the following article: Jordan Blair Woods, U. Rich. L. Rev. 833 (2020).

9. Prof. Camp’s article The Play’s the Thing: A Theory of Taxing Virtual Worlds is cited in the following article: Blake E. Reid, Internet Architecture and Disability, 95 Ind. L.J. 591 (2020).

News

1. On March 3, 2020, Professor Beyer presented a webinar for the American Law Institute entitled Anticipating Will Contests and How to Avoid Them.

2. On March 7, 2020, Professor Beyer presented a seminar at the 2020 Annual Professional Program held during the Annual Meeting of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel in Boca Raton, Florida. The presented was entitled Just Because You Are Still Alive Doesn’t Mean You Cannot Probate Your Will: Ante-Mortem Probate as the Ultimate Will Contest Prevention Technique.

3. Professor Baker has been invited by Atomium – European Institute for Science, Media and Democracy to participate in “The AI4People’s Ethical Framework for a Good AI Society” as the only United States member of the “Legal Services Committee.” Professor Baker will lend her expertise in creating a practical, industry-specific framework for the use of ethical artificial intelligence in law.

4. Professor Beyer served as a panelist on a webinar addressing COVID-19 issues as they arise in the estate planning contest. The webinar was sponsored by InterActive Legal entitled “Practical Options for Estate Planners in Unexpected Times.” The webinar can be viewed at: https://go.interactivelegal.com/l/334851/2020-03-25/21xwc6g.

 

March 2020 New Books

2020 March New Books List

In March 2020, the Law Library added the following new titles to the collection to support the research and curricular needs of our faculty and students.

CIVIL LAW

  1. Fitzpatrick, Brian T., The Conservative Case for Class Actions (2019).

CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE

  1. Gregg Barak, Paul Leighton, and Allison Cotton, Class, Race, Gender, & Crime: The Social Realities of Justice in America (2018).
  2. Avery, Joseph and Joel Cooper, eds., Bias in the Law: A Definitive Look at Racial Prejudice in the U.S. Criminal Justice System (2020).

CRYPTOCURRENCIES LAW

  1. Armstrong, Dean, Dan Hyde, and Sam Thomas, Blockchain and Cryptocurrency: International Legal and Regulatory Challenges (2019).

CYBER SECURITY LAW

  1. Schaub, Gary Jr., ed., Understanding Cybersecurity: Emerging Governance and Strategy (2018).
  2. Ballardini, Rosa Maria, Petri Kuoppamaki, Olli Pitkanen, eds., Regulating Industrial Internet Through IPR, Data Protection and Competition Law (2019).

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

  1. Rogers, Nicole, Law, Fiction and Activism in a Time of Climate Change (2020).
  2. Sullivan, Thomas F.P., ed. emeritus and authors Christopher L. Bell, et. al., Environmental Law Handbook (2019).
  3. Braddock, Theda and Diane Hennessey, Wetlands: An Introduction (2018).
  4. Hassine, Khaled, Handling Climate Displacement (2019).

FIRST AMENDMENT

  1. Norton, Helen L., The Government’s Speech and the Constitution (2019).

HEALTH LAW AND POLICY

  1. Garwood-Gowers, Austen, Medical Use of Human Beings: Respect as a Basis for Critique of Discourse, Law and Practice (2020).

HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

  1. Villa, Monique, Slaves Among Us: The Hidden World of Human Trafficking (2019).
  2. Klinkner, Melanie and Howard Davis, The Right to the Truth in International Law: Victims’ Rights in Human Rights and International Criminal Law (2020).
  3. Gonzalez-Salzberg, Damian and Loveday Hodson, eds., Research Methods for International Human Rights Law: Beyond the Traditional Paradigm (2020).

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

  1. Foong, Cheryl, The Making Available Right: Realizing the Potential of Copyright’s Dissemination Function in the Digital Age (2019).

INTERNATIONAL LAW

  1. Close, Josepha, Amnesty, Serious Crimes and International Law: Global Perspectives in Theory and Practice (2019).

JUVENILES

  1. Howell, James C., et. al., A Handbook for Evidence-Based Juvenile Justice Systems (2019).

LEGAL EDUCATION

  1. Christodoulidis, Emilios A., Ruth Dukes, and Marco Goldoni, eds., Research Handbook on Critical Legal Theory (2019).

LEGAL HISTORY

  1. White, G. Edward, Law in American History (vol. 3) (2019).

LEGAL PROFESSION

  1. Rhode, Deborah L., Leadership for Lawyers (2020).
  2. Van Beemen, Robert F., Rupprecht Graf Von Pfeil, and Gerard J. Tanja, Legal Tech and Digital Transformation: Competitive Positioning and Business Models of Law Firms (2018).
  3. Wagner, Wendy, with Will Walker, Incomprehensible!: A Study of How Our Legal System Encourages Incomprehensibility, Why It Matters, and What We Can Do About It (2019).
  4. Kagan, Robert A., Adversarial Legalism: The American Way of Law (2019).

LEGAL RESEARCH AND LIBRARIES

  1. Law, Margaret Zelman, Cultivating Engaged Staff: Better Management for Better Libraries (2017).
  2. Lembke, Melody Busse and Melissa Beck, Cataloging Legal Literature (2020).
  3. Zabel, Diane and Lauren Reiter, eds., Envisioning the Future of Reference: Trends, Reflections, and Innovations (2020).
  4. Schlipf, Fred, and John A. Moorman, The Practical Handbook of Library Architecture: Creating Building Spaces that Work (2018).
  5. Kowalsky, Michelle, and John Woodruff, Creating Inclusive Library Environments: A Planning Guide for Serving Patrons with Disabilities (2017).
  6. Emery, Jill, Graham Stone, and Peter McCracken, Techniques for Electronic Resource Management: TERMS and the Transition to Open (2020).

LEGISLATION

  1. Mousmouti, Maria, Designing Effective Legislation (2019).

MILITARY, WAR, AND PEACE

  1. Jensen, Eric Talbot and Major Ronald T. P. Alcala eds., The Impact of Emerging Technologies on the Law of Armed Conflict (2019).
  2. Pohlman, H. L., U.S. National Security Law: An International Perspective (2019).

OIL, GAS, AND MINERAL LAW

  1. Rive, Vernon J. C., Fossil Fuel Subsidy Reform: An International Law Response (2019).

PHILOSOPHY AND LAW

  1. Zartaloudis, Thanos, ed., Law and Philosophical Theory: Critical Intersections (2018).

PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE

  1. Vaidik, Nancy Harris and Rebecca Diaz-Bonilla, Point Well Made: Oral Advocacy in Motion Practice (2016).
  2. Diaz-Bonilla, Rebecca, Foolproof: The Art of Communication for Lawyers and Professionals (2018).
  3. O’Regan, Karla, Law and Consent: Contesting the Common Sense (2020).

PRESIDENT/EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT

  1. Casto, William R., Advising the President: Attorney General Robert H. Jackson and Franklin D. Roosevelt (2018).

PROFESSIONAL ETHICS

  1. Rhode, Deborah L., Character: What it Means and Why it Matters (2019).

REPRODUCTION

  1. Lau, Pin Lean, Comparative Legal Frameworks for Pre-Implantation Embryonic Genetic Interventions (2019).

SENTENCING AND PUNISHMENT

  1. Tonry, Michael H., ed., American Sentencing: What Happens and Why? (2019).
  2. Perlin, Michael L., Mental Disability and the Death Penalty: The Shame of the States (2013).
  3. Frase, Richard S. and Julian V. Roberts, Paying for the Past: The Case Against Prior Record Sentence Enhancements (2019).

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES

  1. Fisher, Louis, Reconsidering Judicial Finality: Why the Supreme Court is Not the Last Word on the Constitution (2019).
  2. Kaiser, Anna-Bettina, Niels Petersen, Johannes Saurer, eds., The U.S. Supreme Court and Contemporary Constitutional Law: The Obama Era and Its Legacy (2018).

WATER LAW

  1. Porter, Charles R., Public Water Policies: The Ultimate Weapons of Social Control (2018).

All of these books are available from the Law Library.  If you would like to check out any of these titles, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu.  Library staff will be able to assist in locating and checking out any of these items.

Faces of the Library: Ben Laney

Ben Laney Staff Spotlight

Ben Laney is a pretty good guy. We are grateful for his work. He has been a valuable asset as we navigate this stressful time. Read his profile here:

What tasks do you do for the TTU Law Library?

I work the circulation desk. I check in and out books and I help patrons find the material they are looking for.

What is your favorite thing about working at the TTU Law Library?

I love the relaxed nature of my work. It’s low stress, which allows me to study for class and enjoy working the desk.

What is one thing about the law library that current and prospective students should know?

The law library has so much more content than you realize. The library has a ton of resources that are useful for any legal practice, whether it be criminal, water, patents, anything.

What is your favorite place to eat in Lubbock?

Blue sky. #BestBurgerEver.

What hobbies or activities do you like to do outside the law library?

I play a lot of music in my free time. I’ve been playing the guitar and the banjo for over 10 years. It’s hard to feel sad and stressed about law school when you’re plucking a few happy chords.

 

Online Study Aid access

Study aids are available online! Study aids, like Examples and Explanations and Emanuel CrunchTime, are available on the Wolters Kluwer platform. West Academic has Nutshells and Gilbert Law Summaries.

For questions about how to access books, call 806-742-3957 or email circulation.law@ttu.edu.

For research or reference questions, call 806-742-7155 or email reference.law@ttu.edu.

Faces of the Library: Joe Lara

Staff Spotlight CP

Meet Joe Lara. He’s an American soldier that helps keep students safe while they study at night in the library. He loves carne guisada and talking about Texas Tech sports. Read his profile here:

What tasks do you do for the TTU Law Library?

Work circulation desk and evening facility supervisor. Make sure everyone and everything is safe and secure at night. Facilitate events in evenings.

What is your favorite thing about working at the TTU Law Library?

Staff and students. I love talking to students and working with the staff members.

What is one thing about the law library that current and prospective students should know?

I we can’t find something off the top of our heads, we can do some research and help find the answer for you.

What is your favorite place to eat in Lubbock?

That’s a tough one, I like them all. But I like to eat at Montelongo’s, their carne guisada is the best.

What hobbies or activities do you like to do outside the law library?

I like going to the shooting range. I also collect guns and coins.

 

February 2020 Law Faculty Publications & News

Throughout the month of February, the Law Library received alerts for full-time TTU Law Faculty publications and news. Below is a compilation of those daily alerts for February 1st to February 29th, 2020.

Books & Treaties

1. Gerry W. Beyer, James M. Kosakow, & Myron Kove, Revocable Trusts (5th ed. Supp. Dec. 2019).

Articles

1. Bryan T. Camp, New Thinking About Jurisdictional Time Periods in the Tax Code, 73 Tax Law. 1 (2019).

2. Stephen T. Black, Cyberdamages, 36 Santa Clara High Tech. L.J. 1 (2020).

3. Jarod S. Gonzalez, On the Edge: The ADA’s Direct Threat Defense and The Objective Reasonableness Standard, 103 Marq. L. Rev. 513 (2019).

Op-Ed

1. Arnold Loewy & Charles Moster, It’s debatable: Would corporal punishment have an impact on crime stats?, Lubbock Avalanche-J. (Feb. 2, 2020 at 6:01 am); https://www.statesman.com/news/20200202/its-debatable-would-corporal-punishment-have-impact-on-crime-stats.

2. Arnold Loewy & Charles Moster, It’s debatable: Does President Trump deserve a second term?, Lubbock Avalanche-J. (Feb. 23, 2020 at 12:01 am); https://www.lubbockonline.com/news/20200223/its-debatable-does-president-trump-deserve-second-term.

Citations

1. Prof. Black’s article Psst! Wanna Buy a Bridge? IP Transfers of Non-Existent Property is cited in the following article: Usha R. Rodrigues, Financial Contracting with the Crowd, 69 Emory L.J. 397 (2019).

2. Prof. Beyer’s article Technology’s Impact on the Changing Future of the Trusts and Estate Practice was cited in the following article: Janet Colliton, PLANNING AHEAD: Could your future will be in the cloud?, The Mercury (Feb. 5, 2020).

3. Prof. Beyer’s article Reactions to Discretionary Trusts: An Update by Richard C. Ausness is cited in the following article: Jacob L. Geiermann, Discretionary Dilemma, 34-FEB Prob. & Prop. 40 (2020).

4. Prof. Metze’s article Speaking Truth to Power: The Obligation of the Courts to Enforce the Right to Counsel at Trial is cited in the following article: Constraining Strickland, 7 Tex. A&M L. Rev. 351 (2020).

5. Prof. Beyer’s work in Digital Wills: Has the Time Come for Wills to Join the Digital Revolution? is cited in the following article: Natalie M. Banta, Electronic Wills and Digital Assets: Reassessing Formality in the Digital Age, 71 Baylor L. Rev. 547 (2019).

6. Prof. Robert T. Sherwin’s work in The Changing Landscape of the Texas Citizens Participation Act is cited in the following article: Joseph F. Cleveland, Jr.,, J. Heath Coffman & Kevin C. Smith, A Practitioner’s Guide to the Texas Uniform Trade Secrets Act, 48-FALL Tex. J. Bus. L. 30 (2019).

7. Prof. Camp’s article The Failure of Adversarial Process in the Administrative State is cited in the following treaties: Charles H. Koch, Jr. & Richard Murphy, 1 Admin. L. & Prac. § 2:13 (3rd ed. 2020).

8. Prof. Chiappinelli’s book Case and Materials on Business Entities is cited in the following article: Ann M. Scarlett, The Benefits of Integrating Entrepreneurship Into Business Associations, 59 St. Louis U. L.J. 711 (2015).

9. Prof. Casto’s article The First Congress’s Understanding of Its Authority over the Federal Courts’ Jurisdiction is cited in the following article: Executive Adjudication of State Law, 133 Harv. L. Rev. 1404 (2020).

10. Prof. Gossett’s article If Charity Begins at Home, Why Do We Go Searching Abroad? Why The Federal Adoption Tax Credit Should Not Subsidize International Adoptions is cited in the following treaties: Thomas A. Jacobs, 5 Ariz. Prac., Juv. Law & Practice § 7:16 (2019).

11. Prof. Humphrey’s article “But I’m Brain-Dead and Pregnant”: Advance Directive Pregnancy Exclusions and End-of-Life Wishes is cited in the following article: Shea Flanagan, Decisions in the Dark: Why “Pregnancy Exclusion” Statutes are Unconstitutional and Unethical, 114 Nw. U. L. Rev. 969 (2020).

12. Prof. Beyer’s work in Estate Planning for Digital Assets is cited in the following article: Major Jonathan C. Siegler, Assisting Legal Assistance Clients with Digital Estates, 2019-4 Army Law. 33 (2019).

13. Prof. Loewy’s article The Fourth Amendment as a Device for Protecting the Innocent is cited in the following article: Michael Gentithes, App Permissions and the Third-party Doctrine, 59 Washburn L.J. 35 (2020).

14. Prof. Casto’s book Oliver Ellsworth and the Creation of the Federal Republic is cited in the following article: Jamison E. Colburn, Don’t go in the Water: On Pathological Jurisdiction Splitting, 39 Stan. Envtl. L.J. 3 (2019).

15. Prof. Casto’s article The First Congress’s Understanding of its Authority over the federal Courts’ Jurisdiction is cited in the following article: Executive Adjudication of State Law, 133 Harv. L. Rev. 1404 (2020).

16. Prof. Benham’s article Proportionality, Pretrial Confidentiality, and Discovery Sharing is cited in the following article: Zakary A. Drabczyk, Share with Caution: The Dangers Behind Sharing Orders, 65 Wayne L. Rev. 401 (2020).

17. Prof. Chiappinelli’s work in Jurisdiction over Directors and Officers in Delaware is cited in the following article: Megan W. Shaner, The Corporate Chameleon, 54 U. Rich. L. Rev. 527 (2020).

18. Prof. Chiappinelli’s article The Underappreciated Importance of Personal Jurisdiction in Delaware’s Success is cited in the following article: Megan W. Shaner, The Corporate Chameleon, 54 U. Rich. L. Rev. 527 (2020).

19. Prof. Beyer’s work in Digital Wills: Has the Time Come for Wills to Join the Digital Revolution? is cited in the following article: Paige Hall, Welcoming E-Wills into the Mainstream: The Digital Communication of Testamentary Intent, 20 Nev. L.J. 339 (2019).

20. Prof. Beyer’s work in Sign on the [Electronic] Dotted Line: The Rise of the Electronic Will is cited in the following article: Paige Hall, Welcoming E-Wills into the Mainstream: The Digital Communication of Testamentary Intent, 20 Nev. L.J. 339 (2019).

21. Prof. Beyer’s article Videotaping the Will Execution Ceremony-Preventing Frustration of the Testator’s Final Wishes is cited in the following article: Paige Hall, Welcoming E-Wills into the Mainstream: The Digital Communication of Testamentary Intent, 20 Nev. L.J. 339 (2019).

22. Prof. Benham’s article Proportionality, Pretrial Confidentiality, and Discovery Sharing is cited in the following article: Zakary A. Drabczyk, Share with Caution: The Dangers Behind Sharing Orders, 65 Wayne L. Rev. 401 (2020).

23. Prof. Murphy’s article A “New” Counter-Marbury: Reconciling Skidmore Deference and Agency Interpretive Freedom is cited in the following article: Aaron P.B. White, Using Skidmore to Dance Around the Chevron Two-Step: “Sinclair Wyoming Ref. Co. v. U.S. EPA, 46 Mitchell Hamline L. Rev. 201 (2019).

24. Prof. Loewy’s article Rethinking Search and Seizure in a Post-9/11 World is cited in the following article: Emily Berman, Individualized Suspicion in the Age of Big Data, 105 Iowa L. Rev. 463 (2020).

25. Prof. Benham’s article Proportionality, Pretrial Confidentiality, and Discovery Sharing is cited in the following article: Seth Katsuya Endo, Contracting for Confidential Discovery, 53 U.C. Davis L. Rev. 1249 (2020).

26. Prof. Gonzalez’s article The New Batson: Opening the Door of the Jury Deliberation Room After Peña-Rodriguez v. Colorado is cited in the following article: Ryan D. Brown, Winning the Waiting Game: How Oklahoma Can Rectify the Discrepancy Between Its No-Impeachment Rule and Peña-Rodriguez v. Colorado, 72 Okla. L. Rev. 403 (2020).

27. Prof. James’ article The African-American Church, Political Activity, and Tax Exemption is cited in the following article: Jonathan C. Augustine, And When Does the Black Church Get Political?: Responding in the Era of Trump and Making the Black Church Great Again?, 17 Hastings Race & Poverty L.J. 88 (2020).

28. Prof. Loewy’s article Rethinking Search and Seizure in a Post-9/11 World is cited in the following article: Emily Berman, Individualized Suspicion in the Age of Big Data, 105 Iowa L. Rev. 463 (2020).

29. Prof. Loewy’s article The Fourth Amendment as a Device for Protecting the Innocent is cited in the following article: Michael Gentithes, Articles and Essay on the Fourth Amendment: App Permissions and the Third-Party Doctrine, 59 Washburn L.J. 35 (2020).

30. Prof. Murphy’s work in Eight Things Americans Can’t Figure Out About Controlling Administrative Power is cited in the following article: Ryan Mitchell, Non-Legislative Rules Need Scrutiny Too: The Curious Case of the Appropriate Care Standard, 26 Hastings W. N.W. J. Env. L. & Pol’y 47 (2020).

31. Prof. Camp’s article Lesson for Tax Day: When Tax Prep Software Gets It Wrong is cited in the following article: Susan C. Morse, When Do Tax Compliance Robots Follow the Law?, 1 Ohio State Technology L.J. (2020).

32. Prof. Camp’s article Tax Administration as Inquisitorial Process and the Partial Paradigm Shift in the IRS Resct4ructing and Reform Act of 1998 is cited in the following article: Susan C. Morse, When Do Tax Compliance Robots Follow the Law?, 1 Ohio State Technology L.J. (2020).

News

1. On February 4, 2020, Professor Sutton, a member of the Texas Task Force for Infectious Diseases, participated in the first meeting of the year and a closed session update on the coronavirus.

2. On February 7, 2020, Professor Beyer was an invited speaker for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute in Abilene, Texas. His presentation was entitled Estate Planning 101, and another other things, covered the essential documents everyone should execute to have an effective estate plan.

3. Professor Benham has been awarded by the Texas Tech University 2020 Chancellor’s Council Distinguished Teaching Award.

4. On February 14, 2020, Professor Beyer was invited speak at the Docket Call in Probate Court seminar in San Antonio, Texas sponsored by the San Antonio Estate Planners Council. Professor Beyer presented his paper entitled Morals from the Courthouse: A Study of Recent Texas Cases Impacting the Wills, Probate, and Trust Practice.

5. Professor Tracy Pearl was a featured guest on Wealthy Woman Lawyer Podcast. You can listen to the episode below: https://www.wealthywomanlawyer.com/2020/02/11/tracy-pearl-alternative-career-law-professor-and-researcher/.  

6. On March 12th, Associate Dean Humphrey will be recognized as one of the 2020 Women of Excellence by the YWCA.

7. On February 24, 2020, Professor Beyer’s blog The Wills, Trust, and Estates Prof Blog, received its 10,000,000th page view. The blog is the 18th most popular legal blog in the nation and the number one ranked Estate Planning blog. In 2015 the American Bar Association induced the blog into the Blawg 100 Hall of Fame.

8. On February 20, 2020, Professor Beyer was the speaker for the monthly meeting of the South Plains Trust and Estate Council in Lubbock. He presented his paper entitled Aiming High and Getting High: Estate Planning for Guns and Marijuana.

9. On February 28, 2020, Professor Beyer was a speaker at the 12th Annual Estate Planning & Community Property Law Journal CLE & Expo held at the Texas Tech University School of Law. Professor Beyer presented his paper entitled Morals from the Courthouse: A Study of Recent Texas Cases Impacting the Wills, Probate, and Trusts Practice.