June 2021 New Resources

In June 2021, the Law Library added the following new resources to the collection to support the research and curricular needs of our faculty and students.

HeinOnline’s Military and Government database

New Resources

Military and Government – HeinOnline’s Military and Government allows users to research the functions of the federal government in administering all six armed forces, as well as the issues confronting service personnel both on and off the battlefield.  This new database includes topics such as women’s changing role in the military to the development of new weaponry to navigating benefits offered by the Department of Veterans Affairs after service.

New Books

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW, GENERALLY

1. Paula A. Monopoli, Constitutional Orphan:  Gender Equality and the Nineteenth Amendment (2020).

DISASTER LAW

2. Carol A. Fichtelman, Weather and Climate Law:  A Legal Research Guide (2021).

DOMESTIC RELATIONS

3. Joel Fishman, Grandparents’ Visitation Rights:  A Legal Research Guide (2021).

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

4. Paul Bolster, Saving the Georgia Coast:  A Political History of the Coastal Marshlands Protection Act (2020).

FIRST AMENDMENT

5. Joseph Russomanno, ed., Speech Freedom on Campus:  Past, Present, and Future (2021).

IMMIGRATION LAW

6. Adam B. Cox and Cristina M. Rodriguez, The President and Immigration Law (2020).

LEGAL EDUCATION

7. Beth McMurtrie and Beckie Supiano, The Future of Teaching:  How the Classroom is Being Transformed (2021).

8. Ashley Krenelka Chase, ed., Millennial Leadership in Law Schools:  Essays on Disruption, Innovation, and the Future (2021).

9. Pooja K. Agarwal and Patrice M. Bain, Powerful Teaching:  Unleash the Science of Learning (2019).

10. Malcolm S. Knowles, Elwood F. Holton III, Richard A. Swanson and Petra A. Robinson, The Adult Learner:  The Definitive Classic in Adult Education and Human Resource Development (2020).

LEGAL PROFESSION

11. Robert A. Gottfried and Jessica Rudin MacGregor, Profile of Legal Malpractice Claims, 2016-2019 (2020).

12. Ulrike Schultz, Gisela Shaw, Margaret Thornton, and Rosemary Auchmuty, eds., Gender and Careers in the Legal Academy (2021).

13. Katrina Lee, The Legal Career:  Knowing the Business, Thriving in Practice (2020).

LEGAL RESEARCH AND LIBRARIES

14. Gregory C. Thompson, Harish Maringanti, Rick Anderson, Catherine B. Soehner and Alberta Comer, Strategic Planning for Academic Libraries:  A Step-by-Step Guide (2019).

LEGISLATION

15. Jonathan Lewallen, Committees and the Decline of Lawmaking in Congress (2020).

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE

16. R. Annie Gough, Injury Illustrated:  How Medical Images Win Legal Cases (2021).

17. Joel Michael Reynolds and Erik Parens, eds., For “All of Us”?:  On the Weight of Genomic Knowledge (2020).

PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE

18. David L. Ginsberg and Robert A. Feisee, How Successful Law Firms Really Work (2020).

PRESIDENT/EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT

19. Daniel P. Franklin, Stanley M. Caress, Robert M. Sanders, and Cole D. Taratoot, The Politics of Presidential Impeachment (2020).

SOCIAL WELFARE

20. Helen Hershkoff and Stephen Loffredo, Getting By:  Economic Rights and Legal Protections for People with Low Income (2020).

TORTS

21. Douglas G. Smith, The Rising Behemoth:  Multidistrict and Mass Tort Litigation in the United States (2020).

22. Mass Torts Committee and Courtney E. Ward-Reichard, ed., Mass Torts in the United States:  Strategy & Practice (2021).

WATER LAW

23. James H. Davenport, Western Water Rights and the U.S. Supreme Court (2020).

All resources are available from the Law Library.  If you would like to check out any of these titles, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu

All electronic databases are available through the Library’s webpage, http://www.depts.ttu.edu/law/lawlibrary/index.php.   

Library staff will be able to assist in locating and checking out any of these items or helping you contact the Librarian on call for questions about electronic resources.

2021 February New Resources

In February 2021, the Law Library added the following new resources to the collection to support the research and curricular needs of our faculty and students.

New Resources

VerdictSearch– Provides verdict and settlement research. Each report includes a full narrative of the facts, allegations, injuries, damages and result. Other key data points include, when available and relevant, expert witnesses, attorneys and law firms, insurers and coverage limits, settlement offers and demands, and docket information, such as the caption, index number, court and judge.

New Books

BANKING AND FINANCE

1. Pierre-Hugues Verdier, Global Banks on Trial:  U.S. Prosecutions and the Remaking of International Finance (2020).

2. Philipp Hacker, et.al. eds., Regulating Blockchain:  Techno-Social and Legal Challenges (2019).

COURTS

3. Richard Susskind, Online Courts and the Future of Justice (2019).

CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE

4. Seth W. Stoughton, Jeffrey J. Noble, and Geoffrey P. Alpert, Evaluating Police Uses of Force (2021).

GAMING

5. Robert M. Jarvis, J. Wesley Cochran, and Ronald J. Rychlak, Gaming Law and Gambling Law:  Cases, Materials, and Problems (2021).

IMMIGRATION LAW

6. Julia Rose Kraut, Threat of Dissent:  A History of Ideological Exclusion and Deportation in the United States (2020).

INFORMATION PRIVACY

7. Mark Burdon, Digital Data Collection and Information Privacy Law (2020).

JUDGES

8. Charles Gardner Geyh, James J. Alfini, and James Sample, Judicial Conduct and Ethics (2020).

9. Renee Knake Jefferson and Hannah Brenner Johnson, Shortlisted:  Women in the Shadows of the Supreme Court (2020).

10. Herbert M. Kritzer, Judicial Selection in the States:  Politics and the Struggle for Reform (2020).

LEGAL ANALYSIS AND WRITING

11. Mary Beth Beazley and Monte Smith, Briefs and Beyond:  Persuasive Legal Writing (2021).

LEGAL EDUCATION

12. Primary Research Group, Inc., Survey of Law Libraries:  Best Practices in Docket Searching (2019).

POLITICS

13. Mark Tushnet, Taking Back the Constitution:  Activist Judges and the Next Age of American Law (2020).

PRESIDENT/EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT

14. Laura Notton, ed., Federal Regulatory Guide (2020).

All resources are available from the Law Library.  If you would like to check out any of these titles, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu

All electronic databases are available through the Library’s webpage, http://www.depts.ttu.edu/law/lawlibrary/index.php.   

Library staff will be able to assist in locating and checking out any of these items or helping you contact the Librarian on call for questions about electronic resources.

Offering Support to the Black Lives Matter Movement

protest booklist
Illustration by Jane Mount

These are times of tremendous change and stress for Americans. We are experiencing a pandemic that has crippled our economy as well as being in the midst of social unrest.

The Texas Tech University School of Law Library echos recent statements from the American Library Association:

Diversity is one of ALA’s key commitments and guiding principles. For this reason, the Executive Board calls on library and information services leaders, staff, and advocates of all races and backgrounds to abolish racism against Black people and against all People of Color and to see to it that it has no place in our institutions, our policies, our practices, or our behaviors.

There are many places to contribute, provide help to protesters, and support the Black Lives Matter movement. Here are a few blogs that point to some places where you can help both locally and nationally.

One way to help support is by donating to bail funds. Here are some sites that suggest organizations that accept donations:

ACLU Texas – Protests and Police: Community Resources in Texas

List of Bail Funds for Protestors across the Country

Bail Relief Resources for Protestors

Here are some blogs with additional suggestions on how to support protesters and to help protesters to know and understand their rights.

How to Support the Struggle Against Police Brutality

How to Find a Pro Bono Lawyer If You’re Arrested During a Protest

Here’s Where You Can Donate to Help Protests Against Police Brutality

ACLU – Know Your Rights – Protester’s Rights 

Legal Observer Program on the national NLG’s website (a legal observer is someone who is observing and noting what is happening to document violence they see and if possible prevent violence by their presence)

Law for Black Lives (provides opportunities for legal professionals to volunteer their services)

How to Reduce Police Violence with 6 Proven Methods

Even if you are unable to donate time or money, you can still be an advocate by learning more about the Black Lives Matter movement, racism, and about the African-American experience. These lists provide a variety of ways to explore, learn, and educate yourself.

These sites offer a variety of books and multimedia to help you understand what is happening and why.

An Essential Anti-Racist Reading List

Black Lives Matter: Recommended Reading

Black Lives Matter A Book List  

Listopia: Black Lives Matter Book Lists

Racial Justice Resources

A Timeline of Events that Led to the 2020 “Fed Up”-rising

Trevor Noah video about the protests

Hasan Minhaj, host of The Patriot Act, put out this video about George Floyd

Some of the books in these lists may be available through our Law Library, the main university library, or through our InterLibrary Loan services.

If you would like assistance finding any of these titles, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu.

April 2020 New Resources

gaelle-marcel-Ld6bx4-axwo-unsplash
Photo by Gaelle Marcel on Unsplash

In April 2020, the Law Library added the following new resources to the collection to support the research and curricular needs of our faculty and students.

New Resources

As the semester comes to a close it is time to start preparing for finals. Remember that the law library has several publisher’s study aids available for you. The easiest way to access these study aids is to go to the law library’s Remote Services Guide and follow the instructions.

The law library has just added temporary access to study aids from Lexis Nexis Digial Library. This guide will provide all the information you need to access this new resource.

New Books

This month there are no new books to announce. We were not able to catalog or add new books since staff is working from home.

If you have any book or circulation questions, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu.

All electronic databases are available through the Library’s webpage, http://www.depts.ttu.edu/law/lawlibrary/index.php.

Library staff will be able to assist in locating and checking out any of these items or helping you contact the Librarian on call for questions about electronic resources.

Fun Sites for Stress Relief

It has been an interesting experience working from home, with many advantages as well as challenges. One of the biggest challenge is both letting work go and staying focused. There are times when I get so involved in what I’m doing that I forget to “leave work.” My family has to remind me to “come home!” Other times it’s a challenge to stay focused.

One way to find balance is to build in structured breaks. Just like in the workplace you need to take a break from what you are doing to stay productive. The law library has provided a wide selection of ways to take fun breaks from your work and studies on the “De-stressing Activities” page of our Remote Access to Library Services LibGuide.

destress libguide

Here are a few of my favorite activities.

I enjoy playing Mahjong and like the Mahjongg Solitaire game from USA Today games site. The USA Today site has a huge variety of games that are quick and fun. I highly recommend this site for online games to play. 247 games If you happen to like Mahjong, another good site is 247 Games. This site has a large variety of games to play including Mahjong and Solitaire. This site is a fun place to find de-stressing games.

The De-stressing Libguide also includes a variety of de-stressing tips and strategies including the Texas Tech University School of Law Mental Wellness Toolkit. There are also a variety of online workout routines! You can stay in shape and improve your mental well-being. If music helps you relax, there are a wide-variety of links to music, especially classical music. Another idea is looking for your favorite radio station online! Many radio stations have streaming music available online and it’s easy to click and listen to your favorite songs.

Something else to check out are the virtual cultural tours. The art museums are wonderful to visit. I also enjoyed the National Park Tours. This site provides 360⁰ views of various national parks. This helps you get outdoors in the wilderness virtually when you are stuck inside. monterey bay I enjoy watching various animal cams including the Monterey Bay Aquarium web cams and the webcams from the San Diego Zoo.

It is still possible to go outside for a walk in the real world and enjoy a great live break from studying or working. However, if you get tired of the view from your neighborhood you can always go outside with other people and take a walk with them and see their neighborhood. You can watch people who have posted videos of themselves walking around in other locations. The “Let’s Go for a Stroll Outside” site has collected some of these videos for easy viewing.

When you feel like you are going stir-crazy, watch other places with webcams. One fun site is the EarthCam site. EarthCam lets you watch webcams from all over the world. You can watch the beach at Fort Lauderdale, Florida or Bondi Beach in Sydney, Australia and everywhere in between!

earthcam

There are all kinds of online fun things to do to take a quick break from studying and working at home, these are just a few suggestions. Please email me your favorite links to fun breaks and I’ll follow up this blog post with your favorite suggestions.