First Semester 1L Study Guides

Dear 1Ls,

You have probably already started to hear about how different law exams are. In your Introduction to the Study of Law class, you have probably started to hear about IRAC and CREAC, but did you know that the library maintains a collection of study guides for our students?

            Not only do we have books on specific subjects, but we also have books on how to excel at law school exams. What follows is a list of selected books to help you with your first round of exams.

General Exam Guides

How to Write Law Exams, IRAC Perfected by S.I. Strong

            This book differs from other guides in that it not only goes into a detailed explanation of the IRAC method of writing exams, but it gives sample student responses with detailed critiques of where they excel or fall short. At just about 120 pages dedicated to the writing exams. This guide is a quick read that can help prepare you to take exams.

A Students Guide to Legal Analysis, Thinking Like a Lawyer by Patrick M. McFadden

            You have probably heard already you are in law school to “learn to think like a lawyer.”  What does that mean? By in large, that means learning to do legal analysis. This book explores the “A” in IRAC. By asking the questions that this guide lays out, you are on your way to writing in a more lawyerly style.

Getting to Maybe, How to Excel on Law School Exams by Richard Michael Fischl and Jeremy Paul

            Getting to Maybe takes a slightly different approach to law exams. The book encourages exam takers to identify what type of question is being asked. While plenty of law school exams are traditional “issue spotters” (and Getting to Maybe covers that as well), other types of questions such as questions that ask the exam taker to determine a policy. It encourages test takers to spend the most time with analysis where the answers are less clear and to embrace the gray of legal issues. The book also includes general advice on how to prepare for exams and where to spend your valuable time.

Specific Subject Guides

            The following list has titles for all the first semester 1L doctrinal classes, Civil Procedure, Torts, and, Contracts.

Examples & Explanations

            E&E provides a plain language of the subject organized into easy-to-understand stand-alone chapters. At the end of each chapter, there are questions for the reader to contemplate. Frequently the questions have a clear answer. However, the beauty in this guide is that the explanations of the questions focus on what specific facts changed slightly will change the outcome of the question.

Emanuel’s Law Outlines

            Before introducing this guide, understand, the best outline is the outline that you write yourself. Emanuel’s drawbacks are that they are very long, very detailed, and cover things that your professor may not cover.   That being said, if there are gaps in your outline that you are having trouble filling, this may be a helpful guide to fill in where you find your outline falling short.

Siegel’s Essay and Multiple Choice Questions and Answers.

            While it is undoubtedly true that it is not sufficient to know the law to do well on law exams, it is still a necessary condition to do well on exams. Siegel’s helps with both knowing the law and applying the law. This guide provides you with multiple-choice questions that will test your knowledge of black letter law, and it also provides essays with model answers to grade yourself against. This book is strictly for review. It does not offer a discussion, only questions.

All of these titles are available for check out at the circulation desk. If a title is unavailable please place a hold for the book and do not use interlibrary loan.

Bar Prep Study Aids in the Law Library

If you are studying for the bar exam and need some additional study aids to help you prepare, then come by the law library! The law library has brand new study aids to help you. There are flash cards and Uniform Bar Exam books. Plus, we have a large collection of study aids to help with essays, practice questions, and how to study for the bar exam.

If you have any questions about which study aid is best for you, talk to our Circulation staff! They will be glad to help find the right book for you.

Contact us at 806-742-3957 or email at circulation.law@ttu.edu.

April 2020 New Resources

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Photo by Gaelle Marcel on Unsplash

In April 2020, the Law Library added the following new resources to the collection to support the research and curricular needs of our faculty and students.

New Resources

As the semester comes to a close it is time to start preparing for finals. Remember that the law library has several publisher’s study aids available for you. The easiest way to access these study aids is to go to the law library’s Remote Services Guide and follow the instructions.

The law library has just added temporary access to study aids from Lexis Nexis Digial Library. This guide will provide all the information you need to access this new resource.

New Books

This month there are no new books to announce. We were not able to catalog or add new books since staff is working from home.

If you have any book or circulation questions, please contact the circulation desk at either 806-742-3957 or circulation.law@ttu.edu.

All electronic databases are available through the Library’s webpage, http://www.depts.ttu.edu/law/lawlibrary/index.php.

Library staff will be able to assist in locating and checking out any of these items or helping you contact the Librarian on call for questions about electronic resources.

Research Guides from the TTU Law Library

Do you ever find yourself looking for help getting started in legal research? Do you find yourself wanting to know the basics of a common resource? Do you wonder what resources the Law Library has available to you? If you ever finding yourself answering “Yes” to one of these questions, then you may want to consider checking out the Texas Tech Law Library’s Research Guide Series (also called “LibGuides”).

The Law Library’s LibGuides are 60+ Research Guides (and growing!) on a variety of topics. Four guides are “Library Services”, with guides marketed to different patron groups, such as Faculty, Students, Members of the Bar, and Members of the Public. These guides help different patrons find the services available to them.

small_logoThe next group of guides are our Course & Subject guides, under the collective brand “What2Use”. These guides are resources in particular subjects, tied to particular College of Law courses. Each guide is divided into parts containing primary law sources, study materials for students, and materials for practitioners and advanced researchers. Guides are available for all required doctrinal courses, all bar exam electives, and a number of other popular electives. We are expanding this list, as well as continually reviewing and updating the existing guides.

The other major category of the Law Library’s LibGuides is the “How2Use” guide series. The How2Use guides focus on specific resources, such as Dorsaneo’s Texas Litigation Guide, or general guides on using resources, such as our guides on Legal Apps or Terms and Connectors searching. We are also continually expanding this list, as well as updating existing guides: Watch for guides on legal citation and O’Connor’s Online in the coming weeks.

The last few guides don’t fit into particular categories, but include such topics as bar prep materials, online people & property searches, and a guide for Spanish-speaking patrons to help find Spanish-language resources.

So, check out the Law Library’s LibGuides when you need a place to get started. You’re sure to find something helpful.

Have a suggestion for a Law Library Research Guide topic, or a resource to be added to one of our existing LibGuides? Send your suggestions to Joshua Pluta at joshua.pluta@ttu.edu.

Welcome Back-Study Aids

Welcome back everyone!  We hope you had a wonderful and relaxing break, but now it’s time to get down to business again!  If you find that you need some extra help in a certain subject, the library has you covered.  With our extensive study aid collection, you’re sure to find something that will fit your learning style.  Some of the study aids are also available online for added convenience! (Check out Sue Kelleher’s post on study aids for additional information.)  Come on by the library and see what we have to offer!

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